forced medication


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forced medication

Psychotropic medication to treat the mental illness or incompetence of a person too violent, oppositional, paranoid, or disorganized to agree to be treated. It is sometimes used to help prepare mentally ill defendants for trial.
See also: medication
References in periodicals archive ?
Ohio 1980) (holding forced medication under police power requires that patient is "presently violent or self-destructive"); In re Orr, 531 N.
138) In doing so, the Court narrowed its holding in the case by saying that a trial court need not consider whether to allow forced medication for competency purposes if forced medication is warranted for a different purpose, such as an individual's dangerousness.
For more information about forced medication, including what can be done about it, see the article beginning on page 19.
The National Pure Water Association has raised support across the country for the abolition of forced medication with this poisonous by-product of brick and aluminium manufacture.
The prosecution allegeS s Penelope Webber, 51, from Ystradfellte, Aberdare, forced medication onto both elderly men, actually kneeling on top of one to do so.
It is a move sure to spark fierce debate and controversy, with many factions fiercely opposed to the move, claiming it is forced medication.
This means that from birth to death no one has a choice whether to reject or accept this forced medication, even new-born babies' mothers.
Since a physician's duty is to "do no harm," arguably he or she is ethically prohibited from prescribing or administering forced medication, knowing the intervention could lead to the patient's death.
We wrote a letter asking the court to grant permission to keep him in the hospital involuntarily and to start him on forced medication.
While the ruling was a landmark victory for the mentally ill, it also left open the possibility of forced medication under strict conditions.
Bye declared that, based on previous Supreme Court decisions that tried to balance state and individual interests regarding forced medication, Sell's alleged crimes were not severe enough to justify drugging him.