forced expiratory volume in one second

forced expiratory volume in one second (fōrsdˑ ek·spīˑ·r·tōˈ·rē vlˑ·yōōm in wunˑ seˑ·knd),

n an individual test measure used to assess limitations in airflow, which measures the amount of air exhaled in one second.
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The study will enroll approximately 100 patients, and the primary endpoint of the study is the mean absolute change from baseline in percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second at week four of treatment.
Importantly, the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), the amount of air a person can forcibly exhale in one second, declined 3.
Findings demonstrated that PT010 had a statistically significant improvement in eight out of nine lung function primary endpoints based on forced expiratory volume in one second assessments in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
The parameters of PFT taken into account were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow rate.
The mean forced expiratory volume in one second in male sedentary subjects of age group of 22-26yrs i.
Cheng YJ& et al (2003) in their cross sectional study showed that men who regularly did dynamic exercises had higher forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than the sedentary groups.
On tests of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second, breastfeeding for four months or longer was linked to better scores in kids whose moms had asthma.
The following pulmonary function tests were performed for each subject using a Med-Graphics [TM] metabolic cart and Breeze Software [TM]: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), slow vital capacity (SVC), maximum volitional ventilation (MVV), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP).
Body mass index was used to assess the obesity and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were used to assess respiratory function.
But the researchers analyzed the COPD patients independently and found that those with both COPD and OSA had a significantly higher forced expiratory volume in one second ([FEV.
5 mg/dl), liver dysfunction (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase >40 U/l, glutamic pyruvic transaminase >40 U/l), symptomatic ischaemic or valvular heart disease, anaemia (haemoglobin <90 g/l) and symptomatic pulmonary dysfunction (or a ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to the forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) <65%.
The major outcomes considered in the effectiveness of these interventions included sputum characteristics, forced expiratory volume in one second, coughing efficacy, and incidence of respiratory complications.
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