force-feed


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force-feed

(fôrs′fēd′)
tr.v. force-fed (-fĕd′), force-feeding, force-feeds
1. To compel to ingest food; feed forcibly, especially by mechanical means.
2. To force to assimilate: prisoners of war being force-fed the party line.
References in periodicals archive ?
Winkenwerder said, meaning the decision to force-feed. "In other
The Israeli tv channel 10 reported that the Prison Authority decided to move Allan from Soroka hospital in Beersheba to Barzilai, as the latter's administration expressed willingness to force-feed him.
The child murderer said medics had shown "malevolent intent by halting my force-feed tube" and claimed to be "recovering from the ordeal".
The radio said on Tuesday that the bill, approved by legal advisor of the Israeli government Yehuda Feinstein, has a provision that if a medical opinion determines that persisting with the hunger strike can pose a real danger to the prisoner's health, the issue will be brought to the court which will then decide whether to force-feed him.
The Knesset voted the "force-feed" bill into law in July 2015, with 46 MKs voting in favor and 40 voting against.
Mr Justice Forbes, sitting at Preston Crown Court, agreed that a judicial review into the hospital's decision to force-feed 61-year-old Brady would be heard in private on February 28 and 29 at Liverpool Crown Court.
Suffragette Lady Constance Bulwer-Lytton's privileged background meant authorities refused to force-feed her.
Leonid Eidelman, has long opposed attempts to force-feed prisoners.
Dhiab has gone to court to ask the court to permit him to die or, alternatively, require the government to force-feed him humanely at the hospital at Guantanamo Bay.
Medical reinforcements have been sent to the military prison to help force-feed the inmates on strike.
RAMALLAH, September 1, 2015 (WAFA) Minister of Detainees and Ex-Detainees Affairs Committee, Issa Qareqe, Tuesday expressed extreme concern that Israels isolation of five hunger-striking administrative detainees could be a prelude to force-feed them.
The judge said that Brady's medical officer at Ashworth, Dr James Collins, and colleagues had been 'lawful, rational and fair' when they decided to force-feed Brady.