foramina


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foramen

 [fo-ra´men] (pl. fora´mina) (L.)
a natural opening or passage, especially one into or through a bone.
aortic foramen aortic hiatus.
apical foramen an opening at or near the apex of the root of a tooth.
auditory foramen, external the external acoustic meatus.
auditory foramen, internal the passage for the auditory (vestibulocochlear) and facial nerves in the petrous part of the temporal bone.
cecal foramen (foramen cae´cum)
1. a blind opening between the frontal crest and the crista galli.
2. a depression on the dorsum of the tongue at the median sulcus.
condyloid foramen, anterior hypoglossal canal.
condyloid foramen, posterior condylar canal.
epiploic foramen omental foramen.
ethmoidal foramina, fora´mina ethmoida´lia small openings in the ethmoid bone at the junction of the medial wall with the roof of the orbit, the anterior transmitting the nasal branch of the ophthalmic nerve and the anterior ethmoid vessels, the posterior transmitting the posterior ethmoid vessels.
incisive foramen one of the openings of the incisive canals into the incisive fossa of the hard palate.
interventricular foramen a passage from the third to the lateral ventricle of the brain.
intervertebral foramen a passage for a spinal nerve and vessels formed by notches on the pedicles of adjacent vertebrae.
jugular foramen an opening formed by the jugular notches of the temporal and occipital bones.
foramen mag´num a large opening in the anterior inferior part of the occipital bone, between the cranial cavity and spinal canal.
mastoid foramen an opening in the temporal bone behind the mastoid process.
foramen of Monro interventricular foramen.
obturator foramen the large opening between the pubic bone and the ischium.
omental foramen the opening connecting the greater and the lesser peritoneal sacs, situated below and behind the porta hepatis; called also epiploic foramen.
optic foramen optic canal.
foramen ova´le
1. the septal opening in the fetal heart that provides a communication between the atria; it normally closes at birth. Failure to close results in an atrial septal defect.
2. an aperture in the great wing of the sphenoid for vessels and nerves.
The fully developed embryonic heart showing the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus. From Copstead and Banasik, 2000.
petrosal foramen, foramen petro´sum a small opening sometimes present behind the foramen ovale for transmission of the lesser petrosal nerve.
foramen rotun´dum a round opening in the great wing of the sphenoid for the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve.
sacral foramina, anterior eight passages (four on each side) on the pelvic surface of the sacrum for the anterior branches of the sacral nerves.
sacral foramina, posterior eight passages (four on each side) on the dorsal surface of the sacrum for the posterior branches of the sacral nerves.
Scarpa's foramen an opening behind the upper medial incisor, for the nasopalatine nerve.
sciatic foramen either of two openings (the greater and smaller sciatic foramina), formed by the sacrotuberal and sacrospinal ligaments in the sciatic notch of the hip bone.
sphenopalatine foramen a space between the orbital and sphenoidal processes of the palatine bone, opening into the nasal cavity and transmitting the sphenopalatine artery and the nasal nerves.
spinous foramen a hole in the great wing of the sphenoid for the middle meningeal artery.
supraorbital foramen passage in the frontal bone for the supraorbital vessels and nerve; often present as a notch bridged only by fibrous tissue.
thebesian foramina minute openings in the walls of the right atrium through which the smallest cardiac veins (thebesian veins) empty into the heart.
transverse foramen the passage in either transverse process of a cervical vertebra that, in the upper six vertebrae, transmits the vertebral vessels.
vena cava foramen an opening in the diaphragm for the inferior vena cava and some branches of the right vagus nerve.
foramen veno´sum an opening occasionally found medial to the foramen ovale of the sphenoid, for the passage of a vein from the cavernous sinus.
vertebral foramen the large opening in a vertebra formed by its body and its arch.
foramen of Vesalius foramen venosum.
Weitbrecht's foramen a foramen in the capsule of the shoulder joint.
foramen of Winslow epiploic foramen.

fo·ram·i·na

(fō-ram'i-nă),
Plural of foramen.

foramina

Plural of foramen.

fo·ram·i·na

(fō-ram'ē-nă)
Plural of foramen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quite a few studies have reported the number of apical foramina in the mesial and distal roots of lower first molars (Table-2).
The number and distribution of the foramina, as well as their diameters and locations, were recorded in a similar manner consistent with the previous studies.[sup][12] In brief, the diameter of the foramina and the distance from the foramen to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ-F), and to the alveolar crest (AC-F), were recorded [Figure 1]a.
The original CBCT scan demonstrated clearly that prior to the original surgery the NPD was no longer in the midline; additionally, two further anatomical variations existed: multiple foramina through the nasal floor superior to and connected to a well-demarcated canal/conduit connecting the former apicectomy site with the nasopalatine duct.
Rostral portion of the maxilla bone has become narrow and has given the palatine portion a "V" appearance and, also, transverse palatine suture was "V" shaped and serrated, lying over the greater palatine foramina. The minor palatine foramina were found to be absent.
In the parasagittal view (Figure 3b), a trabecular bone dividing the output of the mandibular canal caused the two foramina to branch out, observed in case 1 and case 2.
Figure 3: The mean distance between accessory supraorbital foramina and the main supraorbital notch/foramen on right and left sides.
Various authors have described the location of the nutrient foramina in relation to linea aspera often citing the most common location as the level of middle one-third of linea aspera.
Only well-defined foramina on the diaphysis were accepted.
No muscles act upon the shape and size of the FM; its prime function is to accommodate the passage of structures into and out of the cranial base region particularly the medulla oblongata, which occupies the greatest proportion of the foramina space.
The data of enhanced arteries and nutrient foramina were shown as median (Q[sub]1, Q[sub]3) and analyzed with Wilcoxon signed-rank test.