forage

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for·age

(fōr-ahzh'),
The operation of cutting a channel by surgical diathermy through an enlarged prostate.
[Fr. boring]

forage

(for′ăj) [Fr., fourrage, fodder]
1. Creation of a channel through an enlarged prostate by use of an electric cautery. This technique may be used in other tissues.
2. Fodder for cattle or horses or cattle.
3. A search for food of any kind.
References in periodicals archive ?
foraging in the region more broadly, embodied in the creation in the
Though foraging is growing in popularity, a complicated and
several examples in which people were fined for foraging in city parks.
This indicates that Mandarin Ducks in our study area spent more time foraging and seeking food, which might be related to differences in food resource availability and climate (Ruan, 1995; Yi et al., 2010).
These differences may be explained by one of the following: (1) females had to store more energy to prepare for their breeding in the following year and so they spent similar amounts of time on foraging and more time on resting behaviors; (2) male Mandarin Ducks needed to attract the females, so they spent more time on maintenance; and (3) male Mandarin Ducks performed the task of vigilance in the group, and so spent more time being vigilant (Zeng et al., 2013).
Studies on the Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis and Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus have shown that these birds spend more time on foraging during the latter stages of winter to accumulate enough energy for migration and breeding in the spring (Chen et al., 2015).
WTTB showed a dynamic attendance behavior, where even the parent responsible for staying on the nest leaves for short foraging trips at dawn, returning after a couple of hours or even late afternoon.
In this phase, the partner coming back from a foraging trip would arrive before the attendant left to forage or a few hours later.
Due to battery related issues and bird behaviour, long foraging trips' data were only partially recorded.
In the wild, psittacine birds spend 40%-75% of their waking hours foraging for food.
Foraging and enrichment allows us to harness this instinctual behavior and keep pet birds busy, active, and healthy.
As a veterinarian that cares for captive pet birds, I use foraging and enrichment techniques to engage, stimulate, and address the intelligence of birds.