forage

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for·age

(fōr-ahzh'),
The operation of cutting a channel by surgical diathermy through an enlarged prostate.
[Fr. boring]

forage

(for′ăj) [Fr., fourrage, fodder]
1. Creation of a channel through an enlarged prostate by use of an electric cautery. This technique may be used in other tissues.
2. Fodder for cattle or horses or cattle.
3. A search for food of any kind.

forage

strictly speaking, dried winter feed, usually hay. Used also to include ensilage and even pasture so that the term becomes synonymous with roughage. See also bunk forage.

forage mites
forage poisoning
the forage contains a toxic agent. See food poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
sedula nests might generate a certain level of homogenization of the internal environment in terms of temperature and humidity, increasing the importance of the colony's internal stimuli when regarding forager exits.
Caption: An MV-228 Osprey from the VMM-265 Dragons flies over Pagan Island as it supports the tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel exercise for the Forager Fury 2012 exercise.
As with challenges presented by the social environment, there is a correspondence between challenges presented by the physical environment and cross-culturally pervasive themes in forager oral tradition.
Without disturbing the ants, all foragers on each grass in each of the test dishes were recorded at 1, 1.
For each run, one student serves as a forager and another acts as the official record keeper.
The change of the resource position prolongs or shortens the duration of the forager tasks proportionally.
The British chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall may be the highest profile contemporary forager but he remains under the radar in most circles.
An employed forager abandons an unrewarding food source at a rate inversely proportional to that source's quality: [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (2)
Firstly, Barker advocates the use of ethnographic analogies to understand past human behaviour: 'For all the difficulties of using ethnographic material, the behaviours of recent and present-day foragers remain an invaluable resource for helping us reflect on the likely characteristics of forager behaviours before farming' (p.
FORAGER returns for his first outing in almost a year with his trainer David Arbuthnot still learning about the nine-year-old who faces the starter for the first time under his guidance in the Weatherbys Cheltenham Festival 2008 Betting Guide Novices' Chase at Exeter.