foot

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Foot

(fut),
N.C., 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Foot reticulin impregnation stain.

foot

(fut),
1. The distal part of the leg. Synonym(s): pes (1)
2. A unit of length, containing 12 inches, equal to 30.48 cm.
[A.S. fōt]

foot

(fo͝ot)
n. pl. feet (fēt)
1. The lower extremity of the vertebrate leg that is in direct contact with the ground in standing or walking.
2. A structure used for locomotion or attachment in an invertebrate animal, such as the muscular organ extending from the ventral side of a mollusk.
3. Abbr. ft. or ft A unit of length in the US Customary and British Imperial systems equal to 12 inches (0.3048 meter). See Table at measurement.

foot

Anatomy The distal part of the lower extremity on which a person stands and uses to walk Components Tarsal bones, metatarsal bones, phalanges, muscles, tendons, nerves, blood vessels, soft tissues. See Athlete's foot, Claw foot, Club foot, Diabetic foot, Green foot, Immersion foot, March foot, Rocker bottom foot, Skew foot, Trench foot, Tropical immersion foot.

foot

, pl. feet (fut, fēt)
1. The distal part of the leg.
Synonym(s): pes (1) [TA] .
2. A unit to measure length, containing 12 inches, equal to 30.48 cm.
[A.S. fōt]

foot

(fut) (fet) plural.feet,

ft

Enlarge picture
BONES OF FOOT AND ANKLE: Left foot, lateral view
The terminal part of the leg below the ankle. The bones of the foot include the tarsals, metatarsals, and phalanges. See: illustration; leg for illus.; skeleton
Enlarge picture
ATHLETE'S FOOT

athlete's foot

A scaling, cracked, or macerated rash, typically found between the toes and usually caused by a fungal skin infection (such as tinea) although bacteria may also be involved. The rash is usually mildly itchy. Synonym: dermatophytosis; tinea pedisillustration;

Treatment

The feet, esp. the webbing between the toes, should be carefully dried after bathing. Well-ventilated shoes and absorbent socks should be worn. Topically applied antifungal drugs, such as terbinafine, effectively treat the condition except when maceration is prominent and bacterial infection is also present. In these instances, oral antibiotics are needed.

illustration

cleft foot

A condition in which a cleft extends between the digits to the metatarsal region, usually due to a missing digit and metatarsal.
Synonym: split foot

immersion foot

A condition of the feet, resulting from prolonged immersion in cold water, in which pain and inflammation are followed by swelling, discoloration, and numbness.
Synonym: tropical immersion foot

jogger's foot

A colloquial term for tarsal tunnel syndrome.

Madura foot

See: Madura foot

march foot

An insidious fracture of one of the metatarsal bones of the foot.
See: march fracture

mossy foot

Non-filarial lymphatic obstruction of the legs, commonly found in volcanic regions of Africa, where it occurs primarily in those who walk barefoot on alkaline, mineral-rich soil.
Synonym: podoconiosis

Seattle foot

An artificial foot designed to absorb the impact of foot-to-floor contact with a dynamic elastic structure.

split foot

Cleft foot.

tabetic foot

Twisted foot in locomotor ataxia.

trench foot

Degeneration of the skin of the feet due to prolonged exposure to moisture. The condition, which resembles frostbite, may be prevented by ensuring that clean, dry socks are worn at all times. The feet do not have to be exposed to cold to develop this condition.

SACH foot

Solid ankle cushion heel foot; a prosthetic foot that has no definite ankle joint but is designed to absorb shock and allow movement of the shank over the foot during ambulation.

tropical immersion foot

Immersion foot.

foot

  1. the part of the leg of vertebrates that contacts the ground in the standing position.
  2. the locomotive organ in invertebrates, for example, the foot of a mollusc, or the tube feet of an echinoderm.

foot

, pl. feet (fut, fēt)
1. [TA] The distal part of the leg.
2. A unit of length, containing 12 inches, equal to 30.48 cm.
[A.S. fōt]

Patient discussion about foot

Q. I think my son has flat foot, how to tell for sure? I didn't notice it before, he is 3 years old now and all shoes hurt him. Does it mean he has flat foot? what else can it be?

A. Pes planus (flat foot) is not a rare condition in toddlers, and may resolves spontaneously as the child grows. It is diagnosed clinically, i.e. by a doctor such as pediatrician or pediatric orthopedic surgeon, and radiographs are not universally indicated

Q. Can flat feet be repaired by surgery? I have flat feet and I’m looking for all sorts of treatments for it- I heard there is a surgery for it- is it helpful?

A. As far as I know- they don’t treat flat feet that are asymptomatic. So first of all check if it bothers you. secondly there are 2 kinds of flat feet- rigid and flexible. There are different and treated differently. Not always a surgery (which is very painful and costly) is needed– I went to a Rolf method therapist by the advice of my orthopedic and it’s much better now. Ask an orthopedic.

Q. Is it possible to have fibromyalgia in your feet and hands? Can you explain? I am very eager to know whether anybody is here with the symptoms of mine. My thumb hurts so much that it's difficult for me to write, and both my feet hurt when I put any weight on them. My hands and feet used to be the only parts of my body that didn't hurt. Is it possible to have fibromyalgia in your feet and hands? Can you explain?

A. Calcium/magnesium
kelp
cod liver oil
flax seed oil
raw apple cider vinegar
avoid highly process foods, especially white sugar and white flour

More discussions about foot
References in periodicals archive ?
Still another example of inaccurate information provided in the footnote can be seen in the following example:
There are no "Footnotes to the Financial Statements." You will not find any such section in published financial statements that are reported on by PCAOB registered CPAs, or members of the AICPA; you will only find "Notes to the Financial Statements." Search as you may, but if you do find one, it will be to this author's dismay.
The Footnotes article also highlights the "density factor" prevalent in the academic works that Professor Austin criticizes.
Securities and Exchange Commission requirement of block-note tagging in extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), the second year brings the next major milestone: required filing of detailed footnotes (DFN) in XBRL
For the reasons we lay out in Parts I and II, the exuberance over Footnote 17 may be understandable, but at bottom we think it is misguided: courts and attorneys should not assess the integrity of academic work solely by whether an interested party funded it.
The idea for an interactive Vietnam Veterans Memorial struck Chris Willis, VP of social media for Footnote, while he was out for a jog along the Washington Mall in the summer of 2007.
(64) In particular, the tendency to footnote as a means of textually establishing authority has become a relic that only the most assured of authors can avoid.
When we called Poynter Institute writing guru Chip Scanlan for coaching on developing the tale into a mystery serial, complete with daily cliffhangers, he mentioned footnotes as a solution for providing adequate sourcing without bogging down this intricate tale.
Except to cite Grant's book in a footnote, Ignatieff has nothing to say about the sanctity of human life in The Rights Revolution.
10, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Risk Financing and Related Insurance Issues; paragraph 2 and footnote 2 of GASB Statement No.
In a footnote, Ginsberg said the justices were expressing "no view on the validity" of Section 2, the land-use portion of RLUIPA.
In that regard a slight emendation to footnote 16 on page 7 is needed, I believe.