foot-candle


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foot-candle

[foo͡t′kandəl]
Etymology: AS, fot; L, candela, light
a unit of illumination being 1 lumen per square foot or equivalent to 1.0764 milliphots. Compare lux. See also phot.

foot-candle

An amount of light equivalent to 1 lumen per square foot.
References in periodicals archive ?
The advantage increases as illuminance drops from ten foot-candles.
However, inspection stations must be either 50 or 200 foot-candles depending upon the type of inspection area.
Most flowering and fruiting plants need 1,000 or more foot-candles, although some, such as African violet, rex begonia, flowering maple, zebra plant and crown-of-thorns, will provide colorful displays even at about 500 foot-candles.
Therapeutic levels under light therapy are typically at least five times higher (as measured in lux or foot-candles by a light meter) than that provided by ordinary indoor lamps and ceiling fixtures in the home or office.
Lighting levels in supermarkets--which averaged about 100 foot-candles in the '90s--are now about 70 foot-candles, according to Steven Grimshaw, owner of Lighting Solutions, a Falmouth, Maine-based lighting consultancy.
The lights can be operated at 100 foot-candles for television, 60 foot-candles for night meets and 30 foot-candles for practice.
Students measuring the light intensity in classrooms when every fluorescent overhead light fixture was in use found that the bulbs were emitting 120 foot-candles, the standard unit of light intensity.
The resulting lyricism moves effortlessly from the firmly tongue-in-cheek ("The Color of Your Blues") to the dry love-gone-bad metaphors of "Radiate Nothing" ("the foot-candles you stood in/they are now so dim") to the painfully sincere and endearing (the sunny, French horn-led "Eyes That Ring").
With up to 1,200 foot-candles of light, this LED PR bulb provides common flashlights with a bright, solid-state, durable and weather-resistant lamp with no gases to heat, filaments to break, or glass globes to shatter.
Smith checked the light levels in his 10,000-square-fore store and discovered readings between 8 and 46 foot-candles.
Entrances should attain an average of 10 foot-candles of illumination, or twice the level of the immediate surroundings, whichever is greater.
The court found that lighting in each death row cell was less than twenty foot-candles, in violation of the constitutional rights of the class members.