foodborne


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Related to foodborne: foodborne botulism

foodborne

adjective Referring to that which is carried by food, either pathogens—viruses (HAV), bacteria (e.g., salmonellosis), parasites (e.g., anisakiasis)—toxins (e.g., botulinum, aflatoxin B1) or chemicals (e.g., lead, organophosphates).

foodborne

adjective Referring to that which is carried by food, either by pathogens: viruses–HAV, bacteria–eg salmonellosis, parasites–eg anisakiasis, toxins–eg botulinum, aflatoxin B1 or chemicals–eg organophosphates, lead. See Foodborne pathogen. Cf Fomite.
References in periodicals archive ?
The workshop further trains the participants on foodborne outbreak detection by studying cases as hypothetical examples, and calls for holding official meeting of the laboratory Pulse Net Middle East Foodborne Disease Surveillance Network committee.
foodborne infections increased in 2018, according to an April 26 study in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
Globally, the FAO noted that some 600 million cases of foodborne illnesses occur annually and 420,000 people, including 30 percent of them children below the age of five, die each year as a result of these illnesses.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), (https://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/2011-foodborne-estimates.html) one in six Americans will contract a foodborne illness annually, and as standards become more lax, that number is sure to go up.
Stop Foodborne Illness wishes you a fantastic spring!
Compiled and deftly edited by Dongyou Lie, the "Handbook of Foodborne Diseases" summarizes the latest findings on more than 100 foodborne diseases and their causative agents.
Foodborne illnesses are a persistent problem in the U.S.
Back in 2006, I wrote a column in this journal about the importance of partnership in reducing the burden of foodborne illness in the U.S.
When preparing lunches, STOP Foodborne Illness stresses the importance of washing your hands thoroughly and keeping all surfaces clean.
Through a collaborative effort between several health agencies, including the CDC, guidelines have been developed for diagnosis and management of foodborne illness.
The Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration (IFSAC) released a report titled "Foodborne illness source attribution estimates for 2013 for Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter using multi-year outbreak surveillance data, United States." The authors used outbreak data to update previous analyses to estimate which foods are responsible for illness related to four foodborne pathogens.
Some persons are at higher risk for foodborne illnesses (food poisoning) or might experience more severe symptoms: children aged <5 years (2), adults aged [greater than or equal to] 65 years (3), pregnant women, and those with immune systems compromised by medical conditions, such as cancer, diabetes, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, or by treatments such as chemotherapy.