focal infection


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fo·cal in·fec·tion

an old term that distinguishes local infections (focal) from generalized infections (sepsis).

focal infection

n.
A bacterial infection localized in a specific part of the body, such as the tonsils, that may spread to another part of the body.

fo·cal in·fec·tion

(fō'kăl in-fek'shŭn)
Local infection that can serve as a source of disseminated or metastatic infection.

fo·cal in·fec·tion

(fō'kăl in-fek'shŭn)
Local infection that can serve as a source of disseminated or metastatic infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mild clinical signs in per-oral route observed in present controlled study were destruction of wall less MG by enzymes in gastro intestinal tract however, little portion escaped from enzymatic degradation caused focal infection.In present study postmortem lesions were more pronounced in viscera of MG infected birds by intra- tracheal rout followed by aerosol and oral routes.
In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), gallium's weakness is actually a potential strength in that AIDS suppresses cellular immune response, thereby decreasing the sensitivity of leukocyte labeling detection of focal infections.
Wu et al., "Extraintestinal focal infections in adults with nontyphoid Salmonella bacteraemia: predisposing factors and clinical outcome," Journal of Internal Medicine, vol.
These focal infections must be drained in order to expose S.
Objective: To determine the influence of rapid diagnosis of influenza on patient management and laboratory tests as well as the length of the stay in the emergency department of children presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI) without signs of focal infection.
cases reported 269 263 188 220 Incidence/1 million inhabitants 4.5 4.4 3.1 3.6 Clinical form Maternal/neonatal 67 64 44 55 Not maternal/neonatal 202 199 144 165 Bacteriema 122 110 85 89 Central nervous system infection 65 73 51 67 Focal infection 15 16 8 9 Characteristic 2003 2004 2005 2006 No.
When the cause of an illness is focal infection from a tooth, tonsil, tonsil tag, or cavitation, and the source of infection is removed, the acute problem usually disappears or is ameliorated.
Most frequently seen in developing, AIDS-endemic countries, infection may present in a variety of ways including enteritis, sepsis, focal infection, or chronic carriage [1, 2].
Bacteria release enzymes like collagenases and hyaluronidase which causes spread of the focal infection. There is edema initially in the dermis which rapidly progresses to necrosis in epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with dense polymorphonuclear infiltration.
Unsuspected or 'occult' bacteremia in children 3 to 36 months of age has been reported in up to 4% of febrile infants and toddlers without evidence of toxicity or focal infection. In countries where blood cultures are performed on febrile children with mild or moderate toxicity, bacteremia has been identified in studies from emergency or walk-in clinics as well as office practice settings (10).
- - + + 99/18 H366 Pneumonia + +++ - - 20/07 H378 Pneumonia - - - - Focal infection/bacteremia, no STSS 95/8 H295 Cellulitis - - - - 98/1 H319 Cellulitis - - - - 20/01 H369 Pelvic clot - - - - 20/04 H370 Thromobosis - - - - Focal infection, no bacteremia, no STSS 97/15 H307 Bursitis - - + +++ 97/18 H308 Cellulitis + - - - 97/21 H311 Cellulitis - - - - 97/23 H314 Cellulitis + - - - 97/24 H315 Cellulitis + - - - 97/26 H316 Amnionitis - - + +++ sag/gene/SAg protein production spe-g SPE-G spe-h SPE-H Focal infection/bacteremia with STSS 94/31 H292 Fasciitis + - + - 95/02 H293 Fasciitis + - + - 96/2 H297 Peritonitis + ++ - - 98/5 H325 Fasciitis + - - - 98/8 H327 Cellulitis + + - - 98/11 H330 Endometritis + - - - 99/1 H360 Occult bact.
Clinical syndromes in the 87 nonperinatal cases were primary bacteremia in 41 (47%), meningitis in 24 (28%), bacteremia with a focal infection in 18 (21%), and focal infection without bacteremia in 4 (5%) (Table 2).