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Related to flying: flying squirrel, flying machine

fly

 [fli]
a dipterous, or two-winged insect, which is often the vector of organisms causing disease.

fly

(flī),
A two-winged insect in the order Diptera. Important flies include Simulium (black fly), Calliphora (bluebottle fly), Piophila casei (cheese fly), Chrysops (deer fly), Siphona irritans (horn fly), Fannia scolaris (latrine fly), Oestrus ovis and Gasterophilus hemorrhoidalis (nose fly), Cochliomyia hominivorax (primary screw-worm fly) and C. macellaria (secondary screw-worm fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Glossina (tsetse fly), and members of the insect order Trichoptera. For some types of flies not listed as subentries here (usually written as one word), see the full name (for example, blowfly, botfly, gadfly, horsefly, housefly).
[A.S. fleóge]

fly

(flī)
n. pl. flies
a. Any of numerous two-winged insects of the order Diptera, especially any of the family Muscidae, which includes the housefly.
b. Any of various other flying insects, such as a caddisfly.

fly

Drug slang
verb To be “high” (i.e., intoxicated) on drugs.
 
Entomology
noun A 2-winged dipteran insect.

fly

(flī)
A two-winged insect in the order Diptera. Important members include Simulium (black fly), Calliphora (bluebottle fly), Piophila casei (cheese fly), Chrysops (deer fly), Siphona irritans (horn fly), Fannia scolaris (latrine fly), Oestrus ovis and Gasterophilus hemorrhoidalis (nose fly), Cochliomyia hominivorax (primary screw-worm fly) and C. macellaria (secondary screw-worm fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Glossina (tsetse fly). Members of the insect order Trichoptera are also commonly called flies.
[A.S. fleóge]

fly

see DIPTERAN.

Patient discussion about fly

Q. can pregnant women fly in airplanes? Please reply me asap. Thank You. My wife is having the symptoms of pregnancy. We have planned to go on a tour to London. I have a doubt; can pregnant women fly in airplanes? Please reply me asap. Thank You.

A. If you have a normal, healthy pregnancy, it can be perfectly safe to fly during most of it. Discuss your trip plans with your doctor or midwife, however, before booking your flight. In certain high-risk cases, your healthcare provider may advise you to stay close to home throughout your pregnancy.

You may find that your second trimester — weeks 14 to 27 — is a perfect time to fly. Once you're past the first trimester, in all likelihood your morning sickness will be behind you, your energy levels will be higher, and your chances of miscarriage will be low. However, you shouldn't travel after 36 weeks.

in early pregnancy, you'd better consult with your ob-gyn doctor first.

More discussions about fly
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