flyblown


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

flyblown

(flī′blōn′)
adj.
Contaminated with the eggs or larvae of blowflies.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In lieu of the earnest--although perhaps too earnest--simplicity of the documentaries, series such as "Flyblown," 1998, and "Cloud," 2000, hinge on overly simplistic symbolism.
He added: 'Caerphilly council can't keep the bypass clean of all the flyblown rubbish from waste vehicles now - how dirty will it get when at least 160 trucks a day are using it?'
While no one could have argued with Middlesbrough's decision to move from Ayresome Park in the 1990s, staying at the flyblown, neglected ground would have been cost-prohibitive - its 1903 main stand was the second oldest in the English Football League at the time.
Bypassed by email and cellphone text messages, they coagulate on rusty carousels outside rundown stores in flyblown holiday resorts.
In December 1938 Orwell told Cyril Connolly why he disliked Morocco: "[It] seems to me a beastly dull country, no forests and literally no wild animals, and the people anywhere near a big town utterly debauched by the tourist racket and their poverty combined, which turn them into a race of beggars and curio-sellers." His essay "Marrakech" contains a series of vivid impressions: brutalized donkeys, flyblown funerals, starving Arabs, squalid Jews, hopeless farmers, aged porters, and wretched soldiers.
After graduating from Oxford, the elder Hartley headed to the Tanganyika Territory, then the flyblown Yemeni port of Aden, to teach irrigation and other agricultural techniques to the remote people of the interior.
Thus reality become unbearably a dream beckons out of reach in flyblown streets of lapsing rose and purple, dying blue.
Trains were overcrowded, cold, and lacking sufficient toilet facilities; at Uranquinty showers and toilets had no doors; the climate was harsh in both winter and summer -- and meat was sometimes flyblown. At the same time they learnt to make the best of their experiences.
Sophie's in-laws, from Montreal, turn out to be rich and welcoming; however, Lily's in-laws, from Alberta, are the complete opposite, dour puritans who work a flyblown ranch in the middle of nowhere.
60-71) Joan la Pucelle undercuts this tremendous construction of a noble warrior by saying, "Him that thou magnifi'st with all these titles/ Stinking and flyblown lies here at our feet" (IV.
The market is flyblown; one of its tonalities is the desultory.