fly agaric


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Am·a·ni·ta mus·ca·'ri·a

a toxic species of mushroom with yellow-to-red pileus and white gills; it contains muscarine, a cholinomimetic, which produces psychosislike states and other symptoms.
Synonym(s): fly agaric

fly agaric

A poisonous mushroom, Amanita muscaria . It usually has a red or orange cap with white spots.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychoactive plants include such stimulants as cocaine, depressants such as the opiates, the true hallucinogens such as marijuana, ergot, fly agaric, sacred mushrooms, peyote, and members of the Solanaceae.
Given the fly agaric mushroom's unpredictable psychoactivity and its unpleasant side effects (including nausea and twitching), it is remarkable that it figures so prominently in speculation of this sort, not to mention in children's stories such as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and in fantasy writing for adults.
Cesar's mushroom closely resembles the fly agaric, but lacks the latter's white dots on the cap.
The council say although people might see the the fly agaric on the walk they're poisonous, and safe species to look out for include puffball, coprinus comatus or jelly ear mushrooms.
The Fly Agaric has been used by shamans in Siberia in small doses to induce trances but it can kill people with heart problems.
It is a fine example of a fly agaric (amanita muscaria) and Chris, of Longwood, said: "Fly agaric is probably the subject of more folklore than any other fungi.'' The poisonous red-and-white spotted toadstool is a common image in popular culture, especially children's books, film, greeting cards and computer games.
He was convinced that Jesus Christ never existed but was an analogy for the Fly Agaric mushroom, around which the activities of an ancient fertility cult revolved.
Also available are Fly Agaric mushrooms, which can trigger dream-like delirious states, and Kratom, which is dubbed the 'herbal speedball' because of its euphoric effects.
Fungi doing well include fly agaric ( the familiar red and white toadstool of nursery rhythms, once chopped up in milk and used as a fly killer; the blusher, so called because it turns pink when bruised; and the ink cap, sometimes used as a writing ink.
Naturalist Gordon Simpson, who will be leading the walks, said fungi doing well this year include fly agaric, the familiar red and white toadstool once chopped up in milk and used as fly killer, the blusher so named because it turns pink when bruised, and the 'ink cap', which eventually turns into a mushy black liquid, sometimes used as a writing ink.
"For example, where I see blueberry bushes and red-and-white fly agaric toadstools growing together, I can feel pretty sure I'm going to find cepes."
But Patrick Harding, of Sheffield University, argues the traditional image of Santa and his reindeer owes a lot to what he claims is the most important mushroom in history - the fly agaric - the dancing toadstool in Disney's Fantasia.