flux

(redirected from fluxes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]
References in periodicals archive ?
At a local Reynolds number of 20,000, the overall fluxes to the flat plate and the flow-protected blade vary little with the angle of incidence, and the two fluxes are virtually identical (Fig.
The range of methane fluxes and the methane gradient length of 3.0-3.5 SD units is also similar between areas although the Clay Belt data set is more biased towards lower methane fluxes.
Analogically as in the direct-current relay we find that difference between the initial phases of fluxes [[PSI].sub.21]( [[PSI].sub.22]) and [[PSI].sub.01]([[PSI].sub.02]) is equal to [phi]-[pi].
The logic behind the blend is straightforward and with obvious advantages: Fluxes devised for Pb-free soldering would better facilitate wetting to Pb-free surfaces than those designed for SnPb alone, and these fluxes are sufficiently thermally robust to perform in the top quartile of the SnPb peak temperature range typically associated with mixed metals assembly.
The fourth phase of the study focused on the effects of the different techniques of using fluxes in the metal treatment of transfer ladles and crucibles upon the amount of dross and its constituents.
Chloride remaining on the assemblies after exposure to HI fluxes is common.
As water is nonflammable, water-based fluxes no longer have to be stored in special cabinets on the production floor.
where [[lambda].sub.x] (nm) and [DELTA](nm) are the wavelength and spectral bandwidth of the excitation radiant flux, respectively, [[PHI].sub.a] (W/nm) and [[PHI].sub.i] (W/nm) are the absorbed and incident spectral fluxes, respectively, [epsilon] ([cm.sup.2]) is the absorptivity, N (1/[cm.sup.3]) is the concentration of fluorophore, and l (cm) is the path length.
Even the right fluxes can cause reliability problems if not processed properly.
Plant A always fluxes its melts prior to degassing because a flux will help trap oxides during degassing and keep the metal cleaner.