flux


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Related to flux: Electric flux, magnetic flux

flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

(fluks)
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity per unit area.

magnetic flux  (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.

flux

[fluks]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
1 an excessive flow or discharge.
2 a substance that maintains the cleanliness of metals to be united and facilitates the easy flow and attachment of solder.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy

flux,

n 1. an excessive discharge or flow.
2. undulation or changing course of a condition.

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux,

n a substance or mixture used to promote fusion, especially the fusion of metals or minerals. Used principally in dentistry as an inclusion in ceramic materials and in soldering and casting metals.
flux, casting,
n a flux that increases fluidity of the metal and helps to prevent oxidation.
flux, ceramic,
n a flux used in the manufacture of porcelain and silicate powders.
flux, reducing,
n a flux that contains powdered charcoal to remove oxides.
flux, soldering,
n a ceramic material such as borax, boric acid, or a combination, in paste, liquid, or granular form; used to keep metallic parts clean while they are being heated during a soldering procedure. It is a solvent for metallic oxides and will flow over the parts to be soldered at temperatures well below the fusion temperature of solder, but it becomes separated from the solid metal by the molten solder.

flux

1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. matter discharged.

bloody flux
dysentery.
References in periodicals archive ?
s] is sensible heat flux coefficient which has been measured in terms of the temperature difference (sea-air) and the wind speed in a ten-meter altitude for all the year months.
Some of the different slag practices that have been tested are shown in Table 3 with their initial composition (liquid part of the slag after 1 minute of Flux addition).
Parviainen and his colleagues have proposed the axial flux interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (AFIPM) in 2001.
As the flux wets the interface between the aluminum oxide particles and the liquid metal, the adhesion forces between the liquid aluminum and the oxide decreases, separating the oxide from aluminum and aiding the metal to coalesce.
The proposed method, along with its simplicity compared to classical DTC, has an improved performance in terms of torque and flux ripple and also stator current distortion.
However, these experiments had been considered as irrelevant because, as it can be easily noticed, the vibrations of the contacts, during the mechanical shortcircuiting, determine signals that have amplitudes comparable to the surge of the current and magnetic flux due to the progressive shortcircuit of the coil's rings.
Over his years as Professor of Political Economy at Manchester and Montreal, Flux wrote many articles and book reviews for the Economic Journal, including his justly famous review of Wicksteed's Essay on the Co-ordination of the Laws of Distribution in 1894 (discussed in section 3 of this paper).
Art director Faith Stafford says Flux magazine is what sold her on going to school at the UO.
It was proposed to perform melting of flux in a copper water-cooled mould with application of a non-consumable (non-melting) electrode.
Are you trying to purify your flux with ammonia and hydrogen peroxide?