fluoxetine


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Related to fluoxetine: citalopram, Prozac

fluoxetine

 [floo-ok´sĕ-tēn]
a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor administered orally as the hydrochloride salt as an antidepressant and in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluoxetine

(flo͞o′ŏk′sĭ-tēn′)
n.
A drug of the SSRI class, C17H18F3NO, used in its hydrochloride form to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and certain eating disorders.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fluoxetine

Prozac® Neuropharmacology A selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake used for clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders Adverse effects Anxiety, nervousness, tremor, insomnia, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia, undesired weight loss, sexual dysfunction Contraindications MAOI therapy. See Serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fluoxetine

An antidepressant drug that acts by prolonging the action of the NEUROTRANSMITTER 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT or serotonin). It is a SELECTIVE SEROTONIN RE-UPTAKE INHIBITOR. It is taken by mouth. This drug is currently being taken by some 10 million people, mainly in the USA, and is said to be the most popular psychoactive drug in the history of pharmacology. It has attracted a great deal of attention as a ‘mood brightener’ and enhancer of optimism. It is claimed to be capable of altering personality for the better. Possible side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, insomnia, anxiety, outbursts of violence, fever, skin rash and convulsions. This drug can interact dangerously, even fatally, with MAOIs. A brand name is Prozac.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Fluoxetine

Prozac; the first SSRI; marketed as Sarafem for treating PMDD.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fluoxetine is indicated for the acute and maintenance treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in adult patients and in pediatric patients aged 8 to 18 years
For the 12 months ending December 2018, the 10 and 20 mg fluoxetine tablet market had US sales of approximately USD69m, according to IQVIA.
Group treated with Fluoxetine on the 8th day and 15th day, showed slight increase in locomotor activity but not statistically significant when compared to control group as shown in Tables 3 and 4.
His lesions were attributed to fluoxetine treatment once more and intravenous prednisolone and pheniramine were given and fluoxetine was stopped.
Treatment with fluoxetine 2.5 mg/d was introduced and increased to 5 mg/d after one week and to 10 mg/d at the beginning of the third week.
Fluoxetine in combination with aspirin decreased TNF-[alpha] levels and increase IL-10 levels in serum.
The standard of conventional medicine care includes fluoxetine as a first-line therapy; however, remission rates are low, and adverse effects are problematic.
To treat residual symptoms of their ischemic stroke, fluoxetine 40 mg by mouth daily was initiated without a concurrent mood stabilizer.
Postmortem serum analysis revealed fatal levels of heart blood fluoxetine concentration of 2.3 mcg/mL.
The results suggest that fluoxetine causes less bone resorption than other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants and "may be a safer choice for a cohort already predis-posed to poorer brain health," the researchers concluded in a poster presented at the 18th Congress of the International Psychogeriatric Association.
The results suggest that fluoxetine causes less bone resorption than other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants and "may be a safer choice for a cohort already predisposed to poorer brain health," the researchers concluded in a poster presented at the 18th Congress of the International Psychogeriatric Association.
Investigators performed a meta-analysis of all trials (14 RCTs; 2490 patients, total) that used the same standardized symptom severity score (the Children's Depression Rating Scale--Revised [CDRS-R], range 17 to 113 points) to evaluate the following medications: fluoxetine, sertraline, escitalopram, citalopram, paroxetine, venlafaxine, and mirtazapine.