fluoroscope


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Related to fluoroscope: fluoroscopy, Flouroscope

fluoroscope

 [floor´o-skōp″]
an instrument for visual observation of the body by means of x-ray. The patient is put into position so that the part to be viewed is placed between an x-ray tube and a fluorescent screen. X-rays from the tube pass through the body and project the bones and organs as images on the screen. Examination by this method is called fluoroscopy.

The advantage of the fluoroscope is that the action of joints, organs, and entire systems of the body can be observed directly. The use of radiopaque media and radiolucent agents aids in this process.
Fluoroscope and associated parts. From Bushong, 2001.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp),
1. An obsolete apparatus for rendering visible to the dark-adapted eye the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials, such as calcium tungstate; currently, image intensification and video display are used.
2. To examine a patient using a fluoroscope, obsolete or modern.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fluoroscope

(flo͝or′ə-skōp′, flôr′-)
n.
A device equipped with a fluorescent screen on which the internal structures of an optically opaque object, such as the human body, may be continuously viewed as shadowy images formed by the differential transmission of x-rays through the object. Also called roentgenoscope.
tr.v. fluoro·scoped, fluoro·scoping, fluoro·scopes
To examine the interior of (an object) with a fluoroscope.

fluor′o·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
fluor′o·scop′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp)
An apparatus for rendering visible the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials, such as calcium tungstate; to examine a patient by fluoroscopy.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fluoroscope

An X-ray viewing fluorescent screen allowing continuous viewing of internal structure of the body in conditions of low illumination. Fluoroscopy has been largely replaced by IMAGE INTENSIFIER methods.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Fluoroscope

A device used in some radiology procedures that provides immediate images and motion on a screen much like those seen at airport baggage security stations.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp)
An apparatus for rendering visible the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials to examine a patient by fluoroscopy.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results highlight this potential trend, as those with less years of experience were most likely use protective devices and use the fluoroscopes in the recommended positions.
Imagine the lively classroom discussion that could occur if students viewed photos of a fluoroscope or other medical object and tried to figure out its purpose.
Using the fluoroscope's software to magnify the image may aid image quality by focusing on a smaller area of the bladder base and urethra.
Olympus JF-130 side-viewing video dudenoscope with Olympus CV-160 image processor and Toshiba CS-11 fluoroscope were used.
The hospital's departments have been provided with advanced technological equipment, for instance, PET-CT Scan, MRI, Ultrasonic mammogram, Fluoroscope, BMD, Cath.-Lab, Ret.com 3, etc.
Without a word he took the boy's shirt off, placed him behind a fluoroscope and turned off the overhead light.
Then again, an Internet shopper wouldn't get to see Benge's once-revolutionary "fluoroscope X-ray machine" still on display at the store.
However, some screening programs used photofluorograms, photograms of fluoroscope images, rather than conventional X-rays.