fluorescence

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fluorescence

 [floo͡-res´ens]
the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.
fluorescence microscopy the use of a fluorescence microscope to identify microorganisms or specific tissue constituents that have been stained with a fluorochrome or a fluorochrome-labeled substance (such as an antibody to a tissue antigen). A fluorescent antibody test can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria. See also immunofluorescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ents),
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence, in which emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed. See: photoelectric effect.
[fluorspar + -escence, inchoative suffix]

fluorescence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence in that, in the latter, emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence

Emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially coloured visible light, during the period of absorption of radiation, which is often of a different frequency from the emitted radiation. Some substances, for instance, fluoresce visibly under ambient invisible ultraviolet light.

fluorescence

the property of giving out light when molecules are excited by incident light. Emitted light is always of a shorter wavelength than the incident light.

fluorescence

Property of a substance that, when illuminated absorbs light of a given wavelength and re-emits it as radiations of a longer wavelength. Example: fluorescein. See Draper's law; Wood's light; lumi-nescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance due to absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as stimulus present.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
The new standard requires most light bulbs to be 25 to 30 percent more efficient by 2014, and at least 60 percent more efficient by 2020, and that's something the new fluorescent bulbs can accomplish.
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