fluorescence


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fluorescence

 [floo͡-res´ens]
the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.
fluorescence microscopy the use of a fluorescence microscope to identify microorganisms or specific tissue constituents that have been stained with a fluorochrome or a fluorochrome-labeled substance (such as an antibody to a tissue antigen). A fluorescent antibody test can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria. See also immunofluorescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ents),
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence, in which emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed. See: photoelectric effect.
[fluorspar + -escence, inchoative suffix]

fluorescence

/flu·o·res·cence/ (-ens) the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.fluores´cent

fluorescence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

fluorescence

[floo͡res′əns]
Etymology: L, flux, a discharge
the emission of light of one wavelength by a substance when it is exposed to electromagnetic radiation of a shorter wavelength. Fluorescent substances that emit visible light appear luminous. fluoresce, v.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence in that, in the latter, emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence

Emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially coloured visible light, during the period of absorption of radiation, which is often of a different frequency from the emitted radiation. Some substances, for instance, fluoresce visibly under ambient invisible ultraviolet light.

fluorescence

the property of giving out light when molecules are excited by incident light. Emitted light is always of a shorter wavelength than the incident light.

fluorescence,

n the emission of light of a particular wavelength by a substance upon absorption of ele-ctromagnetic radiation of a shorter wavelength.

fluorescence

Property of a substance that, when illuminated absorbs light of a given wavelength and re-emits it as radiations of a longer wavelength. Example: fluorescein. See Draper's law; Wood's light; lumi-nescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance due to absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as stimulus present.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence (fləres´əns),

n the emission of radiation of a particular wavelength by certain substances as the result of absorption of radiation of a shorter wavelength.

fluorescence

the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.

fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)
an instrument for analysis (FACscan) and separating mixed populations of cells after labeling individual cell-specific surface antigens with fluorescent antibody. The individual cells in droplets are passed through a laser beam; the droplet is deflected into one of two or more collection vessels depending upon which fluorescent antibody is bound to its surface. Two or more different fluorescent antibodies are used.
fluorescence microscopy
the use of techniques for conjugating antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents using a fluorescence microscope. Fluorescent antibody (FA) techniques can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria and viruses. There are two major types of FA techniques, direct and indirect, both of which are based on the antigen-antibody reaction in which the antibody attaches itself to its specific antigen.
In the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) method, the antibody is bound to the antigen, for example, a bacterial cell in a smear, and cannot be easily removed by elution (washing). The antibody remains attached to the cell after all other serum proteins have been washed away. Since the antibody has been rendered fluorescent by conjugation with fluorescein or another dye, the outline of the bacterial cell that it coats can readily be seen with a special microscope.
In the indirect method (IFA), the specific antibody is allowed to react with the antigen. The slide is then washed and treated with a labeled antibody to the specific antibody. For example, if the specific antibody was raised in a rabbit, it is then treated with fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin, which results in a combination of this labeled antibody with the rabbit immunoglobulin already attached to the antigen.
Fluorescent antibody studies have been used in the detection of numerous bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan infections and in the identification and localization of many tissue antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the prototype can capture and send fluorescence images on demand by culturing cells on the sensor module, it has made anytime, remote observation of the state of the cells in the incubator much easier.
It is important to study the interaction between Cry1Ab toxin and metal ions to understand: (1) the dynamics model of Cry1Ab toxin quenched by metal ions; (2) the factors influencing the quenching dynamics of Cry1Ab toxin; (3) the fluorescence quenching mechanism of Cry1Ab toxin with sodium, calcium and lead ions.
According to the company, SPY fluorescence imaging technology provides surgeons with real-time visualisation, leading to improved outcomes and reduced costs without exposing the patient to radiation.
In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate the use of optical fiber-based fluorescence spectroscopy for rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus (S.
For the first time, we're able to globally map changes in fluorescence over the course of a single month,' Joiner said.
Fluoranthene tracer was selected to investigate the fluorescence quenching in solution and in TSE because the UV light source for the fluorescence measurement system installed at the die has the highest radiation intensity at 365 nm at which fluoranthene is excited and emits the strongest fluorescence emission.
The application and DNA characterization and studies based on fluorescence techniques is growing due to their advantages such as high sensitivity and the possibility to carry out multiple analyses.
An alternate method is based on the fluorescence of tryptophan (while several amino acids exhibit fluorescence, tryptophan's is the strongest).
A small amount of the potential energy is channeled through the emission of fluorescence.
It was shown that chlorophyll fluorescence can be use as power tool for monitoring change in photosynthesis and some physiological parameter (Jovanic et al.

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