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flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flo)
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the rate at which a fluid passes through an organ or part, expressed as volume per unit of time.

blood flow 
1. circulation (of the blood).
effective renal blood flow  (ERBF) that portion of the total blood flow through the kidneys that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
effective renal plasma flow  (ERPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the renal tubules per unit time, generally measured by the clearance rate of -aminohippurate.
forced expiratory flow  (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity.
maximum expiratory flow  the rate of airflow during a forced vital capacity maneuver, often specified at a given volume.
maximum midexpiratory flow  the average rate of airflow measured between exhaled volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced exhalation.
peak expiratory flow  (PEF) the greatest rate of airflow that can be achieved during forced exhalation beginning with the lungs fully inflated.
renal plasma flow  (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 10 per cent greater than the effective renal plasma flow.

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

1 the movement of a liquid or gas.
2 copious menstruation but less profuse than flooding.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(1) the volume of a fluid (liquid or gas) moving per unit time, e.g. blood flow to or through a region of the body, expressed in mL per minute; (2) in psychology, a state of complete involvement and focus on a task that occurs when there is a perfect match between one's skills and the demands of the task.

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]

flow,

n to move in a manner similar to a liquid stream.
flow, dental material,
n the continued deformation or change in shape under a static load, as with waxes and amalgam.
flow, traffic,
n the pattern of office personnel and patient movement from one area within the office to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
At relatively low pressures and flow rates for horizontal flow, the flow pattern could be stratified, where the liquid flows at the base of the pipe with the gas flowing above.
Here again, too high an injection speed or flow velocity can cause the cooled surface layer to be displaced by melt flowing underneath.
Since the material can only move at the haul-off speed once it leaves the die, material flowing slower than this speed stretches as it exits, causing it to thin out.
A question arose as to when air and sand actually began flowing into the corebox, and why did the cavity pressure remain so low.
Traditional thermoset applications in which ULV products are being used include super high hardness EPDM, high heat resistant injection and compression molded EPDM and ultra high flowing TPEs.
The causes of such vibrations have long mystified researchers, but now they have a clue in the form of X-ray images showing the spontaneous development of density fluctuations that propagate like waves within flowing sand.
The maximum flow rate using the test separator was 59 Million cubic feet of gas per day through a 60/64""inch choke with a flowing well head pressure of 2946 psi.
Highly sheared, hotter, less viscous material flows in an annular ring along the channel walls surrounding low-shear, cooler, more viscous laminates flowing in the center of the channel.
Computer simulations have the capability of capturing the action of a flowing melt every 1/20 of a second.
In the mass-flow method [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED], the test part is pressurized and any leakage is compensated naturally by air flowing into the test part from the source, which can be a reference-volume reservoir pressurized along with the part or an air-supply line whose pressure is controlled by a regulator.
When the pressure source is closed off, any leakage in the test part is naturally compensated for by air flowing into it from the control reservoir.