flow


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flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]
References in periodicals archive ?
Free cash flow has long proved a useful measure in the analysis and interpretation of corporate performance.
We carried out the low flow rate oil-water two-phase flow experiment in a vertical 20 mm inner diameter Plexiglass pipe.
* Use the temperature based flow approach developed for sequencing chillers and controlling primary pump VFD speeds.
3D sheath flow was observed by cross-sectional fluorescent images acquired by a confocal fluorescent microscope (TCS SL: Leica Microsystems).
In addition to comparing the flow at a given distance under different conditions, it was also of interest to compare the development of the flow with and without oil under similar conditions.
Based on the results obtained in the reference (12), it is known that the variation of the flow deflection with the Reynolds number can be divided into three types: type A (symmetrical flow deflection with similar degree), type B (symmetrical flow deflection with peak and trough), and type C (symmetrical flow deflection with decrescence).
To demonstrate its suitability, complex valued neural network is employed to calculate real and reactive line flows and bus voltages in complex form.
But in the healthy lung, as the patient forcefully exhales and the lungs are emptied, the bronchioles stay patent and the flow continues freely with mostly laminar flow.
Pumps are flow generators, and that is an important distinction.
The flow of funds to commercial real estate is surely driven by the demand for space and short-term returns.