florid

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flor·id

(flōr'id),
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

florid

adjective
(1) Exuberant; abundant, well-developed, as in a florid tissue response (e.g., to inflammation).
(2) A rarely used term for brightly coloured, reddish; erythematous.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

flor·id

(flōr'id)
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

florid

Flushed, of ruddy complexion, rosy.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When I visited Robert the next day, he was as floridly psychotic as I'd ever seen him.
Timothy Joe Souders, who had a history of severe mental illness and was described as "floridly psychotic" by a social worker, died at the Southern Michigan Correctional Facility in Jackson in August.
"Louis' great passion was for the media," Callil records, "floridly named little newspapers, lectures to the likeminded in halls and restaurants--preferably restaurants--surrounded by followers and henchmen who looked up to him, defended him with their fists, listened to him talking for a long time and drank with him into the night." Callil has diligently amassed details of these unregenerate lives, creating a succinct social register of racist, collaborationist France.
There is a subclass of criminal, which is floridly emotional and that emotionality is almost always associated with grotesque and extreme acting out.
4, 2002): "Talk to Her, Pedro Almodovar's new movie, is calmer and less floridly extravagant, less wired than many of his previous films.
Because it is so wrenching for everyone, these decisions are often accompanied by conflict--sometimes subdued, sometimes floridly expressed--among patients (if they are able to interact), families and physicians.
Textures vary widely (including the use of vocal solos), floridly melismatic settings of significant words occur often, and changes of meter and key are not uncommon.
In fact, even floridly reactive germinal centers sometimes contain large vesicular nuclei and lack a well-defined mantle zone.
Hueffers's as also most of details," while in the former he had acknowledged: "My share in this work is very small as far as actual writing goes," elsewhere his praise for Ford's writing is, according to Max Saunders, "so floridly ironic that it verges on sarcasm." See Saunders, I: 122.
Later, too, Muller notes, Hopkins rejected Newman's "old Anglican, patristic, literary influence" for the "more floridly emotional Ultramontanist" stance shared by such church leaders as Cardinal Manning and the London Oratorian Frederick Faber.
* He moved out of the rectory, floridly and expensively redecorated by his predecessor, and moved into the smaller, vacant convent.
In France, Proust and Gide had certainly broached the subject but even there the leap into the floridly detailed world of Jean Genet wouldn't come until Our Lady of the Flowers was more broadly issued by Gallimard in 1951.