florid

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flor·id

(flōr'id),
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

florid

adjective
(1) Exuberant; abundant, well-developed, as in a florid tissue response (e.g., to inflammation).
(2) A rarely used term for brightly coloured, reddish; erythematous.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

flor·id

(flōr'id)
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

florid

Flushed, of ruddy complexion, rosy.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Or it may refer more specifically to some new approach to melodic writing and/or linear combination that is in some way perceived as innovatory and/or noteworthy - possibly a reference to the combining of a learned isorhythmic structure (one which includes both a notational canon for the tenor and upper parts which are also largely isorhythmic) with a way of writing for the top two voices that is straightforward and direct, characterized by a high degree of consonance and a relatively low incidence of floridity or cantus fractus.
(They come closest to the chordally based floridity of Geminiani's violin version of his own opts cello sonatas.) The version of Sonata no.9 which the Locatelli Trio presents in the main sequence uses graces for the first movement from Cambridge, University Library, Add.
While Taylor's large-scale form has little in common with the small form of twelve-bar blues, he does retain the elasticity of form and floridity of line for which the blues are known.
I recall frequent discussions with a musicologist friend who used Bach's elevated polyphonic style, his apparent intellectualism and severity, his affecting religiosity, to denigrate Handel's less "complex" style and his irrepressible, thumping floridity. Certainly one senses in Handel's music a certain worldliness and even courtliness of a sort not likely to engage contemporary audiences.
If the last section is performed at a slower pace--a point the three singers would readily acquiesce to, given the floridity of their parts--then the accent is far less pronounced.
Our most successful crops were greenhouse tomatoes - 'Floridity', a perfect mini plum with great trusses of fruit whose taste we can still remember.