florid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flor·id

(flōr'id),
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

adjective
(1) Exuberant; abundant, well-developed, as in a florid tissue response (e.g., to inflammation).
(2) A rarely used term for brightly coloured, reddish; erythematous.

flor·id

(flōr'id)
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

Flushed, of ruddy complexion, rosy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both doctors are of the view that the defendant was exhibiting florid psychosis Nigel Power, QC
With respect to internal structure most COD cases were reported to be in the mixed radiolucent/ radiopaque stage and the internal radiopacities were described as being either one or a mixture of cementum-like ground glass or "Pagetoid" (a term used mostly in the description of extensive radiopacities in florid COD cases).
(16) Similar to classic LCIS, pleomorphic LCIS fills and distends lobules in a loosely cohesive manner, but it also tends to show a florid growth pattern (described below) and is frequently associated with central, comedo-type necrosis and calcifications (Figure 2, A through C).
Distributed exclusively by Swaidan Trading Company, a member of the Al Naboodah Group, Florid will be the first passenger car from the Great Wall Motors in the UAE.
The writing can sometimes be rather florid so that one has references to the 'magic and the mystery' of the coronalion: the alliteration is pleasant enough but there was no 'magic', only sacramental grace through the Mass and the anointing.
In a soprano it's known as coloratura - "florid passage in vocal music" (OED).
The recent change of power in Kirklees has hardly been an edifying spectacle with florid language being used, black holes allegedly being discovered in council finances and all manner of hints emerging as to how deeply services might be endangered because of the budget situation.
Professor Eayrs indicts Kurt Jensen's Cautious Beginnings for being long on detail and short on "florid narrative" and "lurid melodrama" The book is deficient, we are told, in secret agent thrills and undercover anecdote.
I was expecting a beefy, bowler-hatted, florid Ulsterman.
Dysphoria, as in florid, as in a boy, thirteen, sinking into sluggish bloom.
His dialogue is scathing: "You must try to not be so florid about your grief: divorce is completely ordinary," one character scoffs.
Florid / light sounds noon, currents green // with overflowing sun and dumped / industrial wastes: the Chicago River turning / mineral, all emerald, tourmaline."