florid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to florid: innocuous, fluoride, appropriate, subsequent

flor·id

(flōr'id),
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

/flor·id/ (flor´id)
1. in full bloom; occurring in fully developed form.
2. having a bright red color.

florid

[flôr′id]
Etymology: L, floridus, flowery
in human skin complexion or wound appearance, a bright red color.

florid

adjective
(1) Exuberant; abundant, well-developed, as in a florid tissue response (e.g., to inflammation).
(2) A rarely used term for brightly coloured, reddish; erythematous.

flor·id

(flōr'id)
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

Flushed, of ruddy complexion, rosy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pridwell won over three miles plus at Wetherby and Wincanton's sharp two miles looks tailor-made for Graham Bradley on FLORID (3.
He also avoids lengthy, florid descriptions of what you will see, leaving that for the hiker to discover.
Gilbert Stuart's famous portrait of Washington - a florid George grimacing over his uncomfortable dentures - is here.
Even in the very florid art world of the '80s you were considered a bombastic figure.
Similarly, in Forever Now, 2001, the wanness of a present-day city street is set off by a florid deep blue sky full of curlicues and whorls that Kurten must have lifted from van Gogh.
BASED ON AN 1875 Portuguese novel and often presented with all the restraint of a florid telenovela, ``El Crimen del Padre Amaro'' nonetheless benefits from a timeliness that could hardly be more fortunate.
Example: Everything from his flamboyant cravats and waistcoats through to his florid style of speech and mannerisms left no-one in any doubt that Auberon was an actor manqu - even though he was a bank clerk by day.
They remind me of Henry Miller in books like Black Spring, riffing for pages on any subject--on a walk he took as a child, on a long-lost friend, or a florid metaphysical conceit.
You can view two more images of the same place, deploy an unobtrusively dotted grey-on-white slider to read more text--and, where the previous text was a tad florid, this is pretty much plain and descriptive.
The young, fresh-voiced cast is outstanding, with Alaskan mezzo Vivica Genaux making fine work of Rinaldo's florid arias.
Few of Five Live's stable of correspondents possess the vocabulary to upstage Stuart Hall's florid match reports, but Forsyth managed it with his summary of Scotland's victory in Iceland.
Clinically, rhinoscleroma progresses in three phases: rhinitic (characterized by mucopurulent discharge); florid or granulomatous (characterized by a hyperplastic mucosal reaction that can lead to nasal obstruction); and fibrotic (which represents sclerotic disease resolution).