flora

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flora

 [flor´ah]
the collective plant organisms of a given locality.
intestinal flora the bacteria normally residing within the lumen of the intestine; some are aids in digestion and food breakdown.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

flo·ra

(flō'ră),
1. Plant life, usually of a certain locality or district.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting the internal and external surfaces of healthy conventional animals. Synonym(s): microbial associates
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flora

(flôr′ə)
n. pl. floras or florae (flôr′ē′)
1. Plants considered as a group, especially the plants of a particular country, region, or time.
2. A treatise describing the plants of a region or time.
3. The bacteria and other microorganisms that normally inhabit a bodily organ or part: intestinal flora.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flora

The bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that normally inhabit a space in the environment or in/on the body–eg intestinal flora, oral flora, etc. See Upper respiratory tract.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flo·ra

(flō'ră)
1. Plant life, usually of a certain locality or district.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting the internal and external surfaces of healthy conventional animals.
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

flora

1. The entire plant life of a region.
2. In medicine, the term is used to refer to the entire bacterial life of a region of the body, as in ‘intestinal flora’, ‘oral flora’, ‘skin flora’ or ‘normal flora’ (COMMENSALS). Although often free-moving, micro-organisms were not classified under fauna. This convenient usage originated at a time when all living things were either flora or fauna. It no longer complies with current biological classification; the bacteria and the cyanobacteria now have a kingdom of their own (Monera).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

flora

  1. the plant life characteristic of a particular geographical area.
  2. a botanical manual from which plants can be identified by the use of KEYS. See also MICROFLORA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Flora

Refers to normal bacteria found in a healthy person.
Mentioned in: Abscess, Stool Culture
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

flo·ra

(flō'ră)
1. Plant life.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting body surfaces of healthy conventional animals.
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
'Oh good gracious me I hope you never kept yourself a bachelor so long on my account!' tittered Flora; 'but of course you never did why should you, pray don't answer, I don't know where I'm running to, oh do tell me something about the Chinese ladies whether their eyes are really so long and narrow always putting me in mind of mother-of-pearl fish at cards and do they really wear tails down their back and plaited too or is it only the men, and when they pull their hair so very tight off their foreheads don't they hurt themselves, and why do they stick little bells all over their bridges and temples and hats and things or don't they really do it?' Flora gave him another of her old glances.
'Dear dear,' said Flora, 'only to think of the changes at home Arthur--cannot overcome it, and seems so natural, Mr Clennam far more proper--since you became familiar with the Chinese customs and language which I am persuaded you speak like a Native if not better for you were always quick and clever though immensely difficult no doubt, I am sure the tea chests alone would kill me if I tried, such changes Arthur--I am doing it again, seems so natural, most improper--as no one could have believed, who could have ever imagined Mrs Finching when I can't imagine it myself!'
Flora had at last talked herself out of breath for one moment.
'Flora. I assure you, Flora, I am happy in seeing you once more, and in finding that, like me, you have not forgotten the old foolish dreams, when we saw all before us in the light of our youth and hope.'
'You don't seem so,' pouted Flora, 'you take it very coolly, but however I know you are disappointed in me, I suppose the Chinese ladies--Mandarinesses if you call them so--are the cause or perhaps I am the cause myself, it's just as likely.'
All this while, why had he not written to Flora? In penitential tenderness, he took her hand, and, to his awe and trouble, it remained in his, compliant.
And presently the brother appeared, under Flora's escort; and, standing afar off beside the doorway, eyed the hero of this tale.
It was plain, from Flora's face, that this was the first she had heard of it; it was plainer still, from John's, that he was innocent.
Flora, this is too much; even you must allow that.'
And in this hope she carried off Flora de Barral to Bournemouth for the winter months in the quality of reader and companion.
Certainly," wondering to herself what was to be done with Flora next; but she was not very much surprised at the change in the old lady's view of Flora de Barral.
Flora of the enigmatical glances was dispatched to them without much reflection.