flora

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flora

 [flor´ah]
the collective plant organisms of a given locality.
intestinal flora the bacteria normally residing within the lumen of the intestine; some are aids in digestion and food breakdown.

flo·ra

(flō'ră),
1. Plant life, usually of a certain locality or district.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting the internal and external surfaces of healthy conventional animals. Synonym(s): microbial associates
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]

flora

/flo·ra/ (flor´ah) [L.]
1. the collective plant organisms of a given locality.
2. the bacteria and fungi, both normally occurring and pathological, found in or on an organ.

intestinal flora  the bacteria normally within the lumen of the intestine.

flora

(flôr′ə)
n. pl. floras or florae (flôr′ē′)
1. Plants considered as a group, especially the plants of a particular country, region, or time.
2. A treatise describing the plants of a region or time.
3. The bacteria and other microorganisms that normally inhabit a bodily organ or part: intestinal flora.

flora

[flôr′ə]
microorganisms that live on or within a body to compete with disease-producing microorganisms and provide a natural immunity against certain infections. Also called normal flora.

flora

The bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that normally inhabit a space in the environment or in/on the body–eg intestinal flora, oral flora, etc. See Upper respiratory tract.

flo·ra

(flō'ră)
1. Plant life, usually of a certain locality or district.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting the internal and external surfaces of healthy conventional animals.
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]

flora

1. The entire plant life of a region.
2. In medicine, the term is used to refer to the entire bacterial life of a region of the body, as in ‘intestinal flora’, ‘oral flora’, ‘skin flora’ or ‘normal flora’ (COMMENSALS). Although often free-moving, micro-organisms were not classified under fauna. This convenient usage originated at a time when all living things were either flora or fauna. It no longer complies with current biological classification; the bacteria and the cyanobacteria now have a kingdom of their own (Monera).

flora

  1. the plant life characteristic of a particular geographical area.
  2. a botanical manual from which plants can be identified by the use of KEYS. See also MICROFLORA.

Flora

Refers to normal bacteria found in a healthy person.
Mentioned in: Abscess, Stool Culture

flo·ra

(flō'ră)
1. Plant life.
2. The population of microorganisms inhabiting body surfaces of healthy conventional animals.
[L. Flora, goddess of flowers, fr. flos (flor-), a flower]

flora

the collective plant organisms of a given locality.

intestinal flora
the microorganisms normally residing within the lumen of the intestine. Ecology is influenced by age, physiological state and environment of the host.
rumen flora
includes bacteria and protozoa in about equal volumes but the bacteria in much greater numbers, and fungi. The important protozoa are ciliated anaerobes.
References in classic literature ?
I assure you, Flora, I am happy in seeing you once more, and in finding that, like me, you have not forgotten the old foolish dreams, when we saw all before us in the light of our youth and hope.
You don't seem so,' pouted Flora, 'you take it very coolly, but however I know you are disappointed in me, I suppose the Chinese ladies--Mandarinesses if you call them so--are the cause or perhaps I am the cause myself, it's just as likely.
Oh I must you know,' said Flora, in a positive tone, 'what nonsense not to, I know I am not what you expected, I know that very well.
One remark,' said Flora, giving their conversation, without the slightest notice and to the great terror of Clennam, the tone of a love-quarrel, 'I wish to make, one explanation I wish to offer, when your Mama came and made a scene of it with my Papa and when I was called down into the little breakfast-room where they were looking at one another with your Mama's parasol between them seated on two chairs like mad bulls what was I to do?
I can't Arthur,' returned Flora, 'be denounced as heartless by the whole society of China without setting myself right when I have the opportunity of doing so, and you must be very well aware that there was Paul and Virginia which had to be returned and which was returned without note or comment, not that I mean to say you could have written to me watched as I was but if it had only come back with a red wafer on the cover I should have known that it meant Come to Pekin Nankeen and What's the third place, barefoot.
One more remark,' proceeded Flora with unslackened volubility, 'I wish to make, one more explanation I wish to offer, for five days I had a cold in the head from crying which I passed entirely in the back drawing-room--there is the back drawing-room still on the first floor and still at the back of the house to confirm my words--when that dreary period had passed a lull succeeded years rolled on and Mr F.
One last remark,' proceeded Flora, rejecting commonplace life with a wave of her hand, 'I wish to make, one last explanation I wish to offer, there was a time ere Mr F.
With these words, and with a hasty gesture fraught with timid caution--such a gesture had Clennam's eyes been familiar with in the old time--poor Flora left herself at eighteen years of age, a long long way behind again; and came to a full stop at last.
I would not apply to him yet; I do not think that can be wise,' objected Flora.
And in this hope she carried off Flora de Barral to Bournemouth for the winter months in the quality of reader and companion.
Certainly," wondering to herself what was to be done with Flora next; but she was not very much surprised at the change in the old lady's view of Flora de Barral.
Flora of the enigmatical glances was dispatched to them without much reflection.