floater


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float·er

(flōt'ĕr),
An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.
See also: muscae volitantes.

floater

(flō′tər)
n.
A deposit of material in the vitreous humor of the eye, usually consisting of aggregations of cells or proteins that have detached from the retina, perceived as a spot or thread in the visual field.
Forensics A popular term for a corpse that rises in a body of water due to bacterial putrefaction and gas production, often accompanied by a nauseating stench; putrefaction is more rapid in fresh, stagnant water, slower in salt water; it may not occur in very cold water
Ophthalmology Muscae volitantes Any of the proteinaceous aggregates in the vitreous humour of the eye, which correspond to degenerative debris
Paranormal A person who meditates for prolonged periods, floating in an isolation—samahdi—tank; floaters use the tank to alter their experiences by reducing external sensation to a minimum
Pathology Contaminant, extraneous tissue, foreign tissue Extraneous tissue fragments inadvertently introduced onto a glass slide of material from person B, which is derived from paraffin-embedded material floating on a water bath from patient A; although an uncommon problem in surgical pathology, ‘floaters’ may potentially result in incorrect interpretation of the tissue and benign tissue being diagnosed as malignant and vice versa

floater

Forensic pathology A popular term for a body that rises due to bacterial putrefaction and gas production, often accompanied by a nauseating stench; putrefaction is more rapid in fresh, stagnant water, slower in salt water; it may not occur in very cold water Ophthalmology Muscae volitantes Any of the proteinaceous aggregates in the vitreous humor of the eye, which correspond to degenerative debris

float·er

(flōt'ĕr)
1. Colloquial term for a cadaver removed from a body of water.
2. An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.

float·er

(flōt'ĕr)
1. Colloquial term for a cadaver removed from a body of water.
2. An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experiment, which was carried out by the Department of Pharmacy at Tajen University, the Department of Ophthalmology at Fooying University Hospital, the Kaohsiung City Government, and the School of Optometry at Chung Shan Medical Hospital, sought to see the if eating a set amount of pineapples could decrease the presence of eye floaters. A total of 388 subjects, with an average age of 42, were divided into three groups, which were given low, medium, and high doses of pineapples ranging from 100 to 300 grams over the course of three months.
A feasibility study showed that a moving floater would allow the ocean to clean itself up.
When the property is installed is when the coverage on the installation floater would end.
We compared clinical and psychological characteristics among different vitreous floater discomfort groups.
A new dredge floater assembly is worth P2.5 million, Erwin de la Torre, a former executive of a company that manufactures equipment similar to those found here, said in an earlier interview.
Floaters look like gray or black specks in front of our eyes that move when our eyes move.
The following is an example of an improper limit and improper rating under a blanket installation floater:
Count on having your valuables appraised regularly to document the value of each item once you decide to pick up a floater to boost your coverage.
Take, for example, that breed of collateralized mortgage obligation known as "inverse floaters." Issued by a federal agency with a short average maturity and typically a very high yield, it certainly sounds safe enough.
First introduced to the municipal market in March 1990, inverse floaters are considered derivatives because owning an inverse floater is economically equivalent to owning a fixed-rate bond and writing a fixed-to-floating interest rate swap that contains an interest rate cap.
New York: Fitch Ratings has affirmed the short-term 'F2' ratings assigned to the Floater Certificates of the Dexia Credit Local Certificates Trust series listed below:
Another Kind of Floater. A Weiss ring is a floater that appears as a ring shape, and is generally larger than other floaters.