flight feather


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flight feather

n.
Any of the comparatively large, stiff feathers of a bird's wing or tail that are necessary for flight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some birds become flightless during this process, whilst others, as they cast their flight feathers, are to some degree debilitated and are thus more vulnerable to attack by predators.
Collister and Wicklum (1996) found that the distal extent of white color on the primary flight feathers, tail length, and bill depth contributed the most to discrimination between sexes in their sample of loggerhead shrikes on the Canadian prairies.
The research presented in this paper focuses on the viscoelastic characterization of flight feather shaft of long-eared owl (Asio otus, Strigiformes), pigeon (Columba livia, Columbiformes), and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos, Falconiformes) to reveal the damping ability of their dynamic feathers on wings.
The purpose of trimming flight feathers is to prevent the bird from flying too far or too high.
of Type of sample tested Median (range) Kidney/spleen pool 7 1.0 ([less than or equal to] 1.0 to 3.3) Cloacal swab 12 1.9 ([less than or equal to] 1.0 to 4.0) Vascular pulp of 12 4.9 (3.5 to [greater than or flight feather equal to 7.4)
The difference in flight feather molt intensity between Blue-black Grassquit and Gray Seedeater and between age classes, within and between species, was evaluated with Mann-Whitney U tests.
The potential importance of migratory stopover sites as flight feather molt staging areas: a review for neotropical migrants.
Washington, June 16 (ANI): In a new research, scientists have provided evidence that maximum body size in birds is constrained by the amount of time it takes to replace the flight feathers during molt.
I picked it up to inspect it and quickly realized, because of its extreme asymmetry and color, that it was a primary flight feather from a blue jay's right wing.
It lacked the long, strong flight feathers characteristic of birds.
The dead nestling was mostly feathered and about 9-d-old, based on the stubby tail feathers and the flight feathers still mostly sheathed (wing chord = 42 mm); the only visible wound on the dead nestling was a patch of torn skin on the neck near the base of the mandible (Fig.