flexure

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flexure

 [flek´sher]
a bend or fold.
caudal flexure the bend at the aboral end of the embryo.
cephalic flexure the curve in the mid-brain of the embryo.
cervical flexure a bend in the neural tube of the embryo at the junction of the brain and spinal cord.
colic flexure, left the angular junction of the transverse and descending colon.
colic flexure, right the angular junction of the ascending and transverse colon.
dorsal flexure one of the flexures in the mid-dorsal region of the embryo.
duodenojejunal flexure the bend at the junction of the duodenum and jejunum.
hepatic flexure right colic flexure.
lumbar flexure the ventral curvature in the lumbar region of the back.
mesencephalic flexure a bend in the neural tube of the embryo at the level of the mesencephalon, or mid-brain.
pontine flexure a flexure of the hindbrain in the embryo.
sacral flexure caudal flexure.
sigmoid flexure sigmoid colon.
splenic flexure left colic flexure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

flex·ure

(flek'shŭr), [TA]
A bend, as in an organ or structure.
Synonym(s): flexura [TA]
[L. flexura]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flexure

(flĕk′shər)
n.
1. A curve, turn, or fold, such as a bend in a tubular organ: a flexure of the colon.
2. The act or an instance of bending or flexing; flexion.

flex′ur·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flex·ure

(flek'shŭr) [TA]
A bend, as in an organ or structure.
Synonym(s): flexura [TA] .
[L. flexura]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

flexure

A bend, curve, angle or fold. The hepatic flexure in the large intestine (colon) is the angle near the liver between the vertical ascending colon and the roughly horizontal transverse colon.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

flex·ure

(flek'shŭr) [TA]
A bend, as in an organ or structure.
[L. flexura]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
However, at the small scale, forces behave differently so that a 100-micron steel wire which might seem pretty flexible at a macro scale, will be stiff enough to disrupt the smooth motion of the flexure mechanism.
Dowling-Degos disease (reticulate pigmented anomaly of the flexures): a clinical and histopathologic study of 6 cases.
Reticular pigmented anomaly of the flexures. Arch Dermatol.
The phase and amplitude stability versus flexure for a 360[degrees] turn around 4" mandrel is shown in Table 3 for 18 to 65 GHz, while the phase change during movement and recovery from DC to 40 GHz is illustrated in Figure 1.
FLEXURE (360[degrees] AROUND A 4" MANDREL) Frequency Phase Amplitude (GHz) ([degrees]) (dB) 18.0 2.5 0.05 26.5 3.0 0.07 40.0 7.0 0.20 50.0 8.0 0.50 60.0 10.0 0.62 65.0 12.0 0.70 MegaPhase LLC, Stroudsburg, PA (570) 424-8400 or (877)-MEGAPHASE, (877) 634-2742, www.MegaPhase.com.
The moisture conditioned PA joints only survived 20% of the required flexures (+/- 45 degrees), compared with the unconditioned parts surviving 144% of the required flexure cycles.
The flexure fatigue properties of the material were the most critical design parameter considered.
In one observed encounter, the crustacean remained attached during three sequential flexures before becoming dislodged; in all other instances, the crustacean was dislodged by the initial arm movement and swam away.
Sediment containing a mixture of particles ranging in size from 1 to several millimeters elicited discrete flexures of individual arms when individual particles struck [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 9 OMITTED].
The MC Series has higher torque capacity and torsional stiffness with two sets of flexures for increased parallel offset.
Meanwhile, the MC Series has higher torque capacity and torsional stiffness with two sets of flexures for increased parallel offset.
The combination of these technologies eliminates eight of the traditional eleven flexures found in balances using normal magnetic force restoration.