flexion

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Related to flexions: flexor muscle

flexion

 [flek´shun]
1. the act of bending or the condition of being bent.
2. in obstetrics, the normal bending forward of the head of the fetus in the uterus or birth canal so that the chin rests on the chest, thereby presenting the smallest diameter of the vertex.
plantar flexion bending of the toes or foot downwards toward the sole.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn), [TA] Avoid the misspelling flection.
1. The act of flexing or bending, for example, bending of a joint to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine so that the concavity of the curve looks forward.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

/flex·ion/ (flek´shun) the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion

(flĕk′shən)
n.
1. also flection Anatomy
a. The act of bending a joint or limb in the body by the action of flexors.
b. The resulting condition of being bent.
2. A part that is bent.

flexion

[flek′shən]
Etymology: L, flectere, to bend
1 a movement allowed by certain joints of the skeleton that decreases the angle between two adjoining bones, such as bending the elbow, which decreases the angle between the humerus and the ulna. Compare extension.
2 a resistance to the descent of the fetus through the birth canal that causes the neck to flex so the chin approaches the chest. Thus the smallest diameter (suboccipitobregmatic) of the vertex presents.
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Flexion and extension of the elbow

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending, e.g., bending of a joint so as to approximate the parts it connects; bending of the spine.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
See: open-packed position (2)
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

1. The act of bending of a joint or other part or the state of being bent.
2. Pertaining to a bent part as in flexion deformity.

flexion (flekˑ·shn),

n movement of a limb to decrease the angle of a joint.
Enlarge picture
Flexion.
flexion, bilateral sacral,
n condition in which the sacrum has rotated around a central transverse axis so that the sacral base moves forward between the bones of the pelvis. Also called
sacral base anterior.
flexion, craniosacral,
n movement characterized by ascending motion of the sphenobasilar symphysis and backward motion of the sacral base.
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Flexion, craniosacral.
flexion, sacral,
n anterior movement of the sacral base relative to the hip bones.
flexion, SBS,
n rotation of the occipital and sphenoid bones in opposing directions about parallel transverse axes, thus resulting in superior positioning of the basilar portion of both bones and an increase in the posterior convexity between them. Also called
sphenobasilar synchondrosis (symphysis) flexion.

flex·ion

(flek'shŭn)
1. The act of flexing or bending.
2. The condition of being flexed or bent.
Synonym(s): open-packed position (2) .
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]

flexion

the act of bending or the condition of being bent.

flexion reflex
see flexor reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the measured RoMs in the prosthetic knee were significantly higher than those of the intact leg, while, at the same time, somewhat smaller than those in the control group, the total flexion was similar in all cases.
For the amputee, it has been shown that by increasing the additional load (+1/3 BW in the prosthesis, +2/3BW in the intact leg), flexion in the knee decreases.
The purpose of the study was to simulate skiing in a laboratory, to analyse the flexion in ski boot, ankle and knee joints in an amputee with an above-knee amputation of leg and to compare them with his intact leg and a control group of regular skiers.
However, considering the fact that the stability examination has been often limited to up to 30 degrees knee flexion in previous studies, it remains a question that whether this improvement is limited to knee extension and early flexion angles, or it is maintained during mid and deep flexion.
Another interesting finding of the present study was the pattern of variation of the knee stability with flexion angle following bracing.
So, at higher flexion angles they might stand more freely on the limb due to the change of the soft tissue volume.
Some design modifications might be also suggested to improve the efficacy of knee bracing at mid and deep knee flexion, e.