flex

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flexion

 [flek´shun]
1. the act of bending or the condition of being bent.
2. in obstetrics, the normal bending forward of the head of the fetus in the uterus or birth canal so that the chin rests on the chest, thereby presenting the smallest diameter of the vertex.
plantar flexion bending of the toes or foot downwards toward the sole.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

flex

(fleks), In medical contexts, avoid using this word in the colloquial sense of contract (a muscle).
To bend; to move a joint in such a direction as to approximate the two parts that it connects.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flex

(flĕks)
v.
1. To bend.
2. To contract a muscle.
3. To move a joint so that the parts it connects approach each other.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flex

verb
(1) To bend.
(2) To tighten.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

FLEX

Federal licensing exam Graduate education An examination required of physicians before they can practice medicine in the US, which consists of a 3 day multiple-choice assessment of knowlege in 'basic' and 'clinical' sciences
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flex

(fleks)
To bend; to move a joint in such a direction as to approximate the two parts which it connects.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Flex

To bend.
Mentioned in: Fingertip Injuries
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To test this hypothesis, we examined particle penetration in skin samples that were subjected to repeated 45[degrees] flexure, 20 flexures per minute, and control tissues taken from the same skin sample as the experimental tissues but not flexed. Penetration of fluorospheres into the skin was evaluated in 20-[micro]m-thick cross sections by laser scanning confocal microscopy.
Among the six subjects, RPs began about half a second before a muscle flexed, while conscious awareness of the intention to move was reported about three-tenths of a second later.
Even a minimal shift by the flex in the molded assembly can result in extreme tension compression forces when the assembly is flexed.