flesh

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flesh

 [flesh]
the soft muscular tissue of the body.
goose flesh transitory erection of the hair follicles due to contraction of the arrectores muscles, a reflection of sympathetic nerve discharge such as occurs with cold or shock; called also cutis anserina.
proud flesh exuberant amounts of soft, edematous, unhealthy-looking granulation tissue developing during healing of large surface wounds.

flesh

(flesh),
1. Synonym(s): muscular tissue
2. A general term for soft tissues, referring particularly to skin, subcutaneous tissue, fat, and muscle.
[A.S. flaesc]

flesh

(flĕsh)
n.
The soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate, covering the bones and consisting mainly of skeletal muscle and fat.

flesh′y adj.

flesh

Skin and/or muscle. See Fish flesh, Proud flesh.

flesh

(flesh)
1. Living tissue, especially soft tissues as contrasted with bone.
2. Synonym(s): muscular tissue.
3. The meat of animals used for food.
[A.S. flaesc]
References in periodicals archive ?
you will be fleshless. [...]/ If my heart wishes,/ my life would become
Flesh itself disappears in the figuring of material embodiment as a state in which we are all, ultimately, refined into perfect, fleshless whiteness.
First, there is the visual congruency of Hodges' painting, A View of Cape Stephens (New Zealand) in Cook's Straits with Waterspout and its "woman and fleshless Pheere." Second, while the albatross represents a Christian soul, it also suggests a totemic necklace worn by the ancient mariner, and thus not only a transgression of Christian values but also an act of idolatory.
The book begins, "I've heard from visitors, Firmus, that you had condemned fleshless food and reverted to consuming flesh.
In the 1560s John Hayward wrote of a fleshless child who yet had "a collar of fleshe and skinne, pleighted and foulded like a double ruffe ...
Gragnolati concentrates on the persistence of individual identity, and on Dante's emphasis (unusual for the formal theology of his time) on "sociable" love in Heaven, on regaining the individual loves of one's life--affections that must, he says, be expressed through embraces, through the body: "the fleshless shades lack something that is tightly connected to the intimate sphere of one's desires and affections"; Dante "associates the lack of flesh with the difficulty of interacting with one's beloved in an affectionate way" (149).
It was all covered with blotches, and preternaturally dark and discolored; it was withered away, quite shrunken and fleshless; it breathed only amid pantings and gaspings, and moaned painfully at every gasp.
Ironically, this results in a fleshless humanism, a dehumanized humanism.
The resonances of this feminine-maternal substratum of his personality and ability to practise the care for the dead were also discernible in the way he deliberated as to what to do with his wife's fleshless bones.
The discourse of medicine is schematized, fleshless. If a word may have a certain impact on one person, but none on another, medicine uses the same discourses over and over again.
To the fleshless image of Bewick the engraver, Jenny gives us Bewick the mischievous schoolboy who would rather spend the day in the woods than attend class.
Such fleshless encounters are an intolerable substitution for this mother, who will be comforted neither by God's consolation nor by her child's safe harbor in heaven.