fledge


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fledge

(flĕj)
v. fledged, fledging, fledges
v.tr.
1. To raise (a young bird) until it is ready to leave the nest: a pair of ducks that fledged several young.
2. To cover with or as if with feathers.
3. Archaic To provide (an arrow) with feathers.
v.intr.
1. To grow the plumage necessary for flight.
2. To leave the nest: nestlings that are about to fledge.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fledge failure.--A total of 1234 (48.4%) monitored nests did not fledge any young, while our successful nests (hatched at least one young) had a fledging rate of 77.2%.
Henny (1972) found that a stable Black-crowned Night-Heron population must fledge 2.00 -2.10 young per breeding pair, which suggests that the Black-crowned Night-Heron population in northeast South Dakota may be declining as only 1.1 [+ or -] 0.18 young were fledged per nest.
The newspaper noted that the Fledge HEV, which includes a 200 ampere-hour battery and a 1.3-liter gasoline tank, will compete in the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association's Tour de Sol later this month.
A number of species do show evidence of low survivorship of young that fledge from large broods (Tinbergen and Boerlijst 1990, reviewed by Magrath [1991]), but the pattern is certainly not universal (e.g., Hochachka and Smith 1991).
Generally, chicks were more likely to fledge from SYNC broods than from ASYNC broods, from small rather than medium or large broods, and if they were early-hatched rather than late-hatched chicks.
Therefore, I separated distance of movements by first and second broods based on the date of fledge. Nestlings from first clutches fledged 6-12 June.
Tanagers, on the other hand, were able to fledge mixed broods, and were impacted by a higher rate of removal of eggs of the host by cowbirds and increased competition for food in multiply parasitized nests.
Via a camera broadcasting from one nest to Kielder Castle Cafe in the visitor centre and Northumbrian Water's Leaplish Waterside Park, bird-watchers caught the first to fledge this time around.
The need for up grading the post to full fledge police station was direly felt in order to maintain law and order, control crimes and fulfil needs of the people.
Nine of these have come from the Derwent Valley and one from Teesdale and the other youngster, raised in the Tyne Valley, was the first red kite to fledge in Northumberland since at least the 1830s.
They decided to trick the parent birds, by swapping chicks of different ages between nests - which the birds make in burrows in the ground - to see how this affected both parental care and the time chicks took to fledge.