flavor


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Related to flavor: flavour

fla·vor

(flā'vŏr),
1. The quality (influenced mainly by odor) affecting the taste of a substance.
2. A therapeutically inert substance added to a prescription to give an agreeable taste to the mixture.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr., fr. L.L. flator, aroma, fr. flo, to blow]

flavor

(flā′vor)
1. The quality of a substance that affects the sense of taste. It may also stimulate the sense of smell.
2. A material added to a food or medicine to improve its taste.

fla·vor

(flā'vŏr)
The quality (influenced mainly by odor) affecting taste of a substance.
[M.E., fr. O. Fr., fr. L.L. flator, aroma, fr. flo, to blow]
References in periodicals archive ?
The simple main effect of solution in the saline condition was the test of preference for the ethanol-paired flavor in the absence of drug, and it was significant, F(1, 7) = 27.7, p [less than] .001.
"There have been some fast-growth vegetable flavor innovations in the last few years," says Wai-Poi at Beam Suntory.
For Belvedere vodka, cocktail trends are important as they expand their flavor portfolio, says North American brand ambassador Brian Stewart.
Wilson also recommends that retailers look to emerging trends in craft cocktails, craft spirits and beer flavors for flavor inspiration.
Colleen Roberts, director of sales for South Plainfield, N.J.-based Flavor Dynamics Inc., agrees that flavor companies are a valuable resource for flavor trends.
Specialized cells on your tongue, for example, give you the power to enjoy (and gag at) the spices and other flavors of the world's cuisines.
Add a sauce made of Japanese soy sauce, vegetable broth, sake (Japanese rice wine), and sugar to the broth for flavor.
The eight regular and three diet flavors are sweetened using organic evaporated cane juice.
After hooking electrodes to the rodents' gustatory nerves, the researchers tested the nerves' reactions to touch and various flavor chemicals.
While the umami flavor/sensation has been understood by the Chinese for more than 1,000 years, apparently the first identification of a protein-based savory flavor was made by the Japanese in the early 1900s.
Your tongue can pick out only five flavors--sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami (meaty flavor).