flavin


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flavin

 [fla´vin]
any of a group of water-soluble yellow pigments widely distributed in animals and plants, including riboflavin and yellow enzymes.
flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) a coenzyme that is a condensation product of riboflavin phosphate and adenylic acid; it forms the prosthetic group (non–amino acid component) of certain enzymes, including d-amino acid oxidase and xanthine oxidase, and is important in electron transport in mitochondria.
flavin mononucleotide (FMN) a derivative of riboflavin consisting of a three-ring system (isoalloxazine) attached to an alcohol (ribitol); it acts as a coenzyme for a number of oxidative enzymes, including l-amino acid oxidase and cytochrome C reductase.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fla·vin

, flavine (flā'vin, -vēn, flav'in, -ēn),
1. Synonym(s): riboflavin
2. A yellow acridine dye, preparations of which are used as antiseptics.
[L. flavus, yellow]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flavin

(flā′vĭn) also

flavine

(-vēn′)
n.
Any of various molecules, including riboflavin, found in plant and animal tissue as coenzymes of flavoproteins. They are variously yellow, red, blue, or colorless depending on the oxidation state.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ri·bo·fla·vin

(rī'bō-flā'vin)
A heat-stable factor of the vitamin B complex with isoalloxazine nucleotides that are coenzymes of the flavohydrogenases.
Synonym(s): flavin, flavine, riboflavine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

flavin

One of a range of water soluble yellow pigments that includes the vitamin RIBOFLAVIN. Flavins occur in the tissues as coenzymes of FLAVOPROTEINS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Flavin also notes that there are many factors in cancer patients that down-regulate the immune system.
Previously, Flavin was the co-founder and executive director of MATTER, a Chicago healthcare technology startup.
The following month he blocked Ms Flavin's car at her work so he could speak to her, and continued to leave voice messages demanding her to call him, and telling her: "I love you".
Mr Rees questioned the reliability of Ms Flavin's evidence after she accepted she "had a problem" with Pesticcio.
The same was true for my brother-in-law, who died earlier this year, I told Flavin. If the Sox were on TV, Ed was watching the game.
In cultural retrospect, it is disappointing that though the Flavin Icons were made during Vatican II, which conservatives still accuse of being all too immanentist in thrust, Flavin might conceivably have produced some appropriate new mode of post-Conciliar religious icon, had he not jumped ship.
'You won't be able to understand Don from reading about him in books--you have to see the space,' says Flavin Judd.
The Dan Flavin Art Institute is hidden away in Bridgehampton, Long Island, in an inconspicuous house whose street address is unlisted on the Dia Foundation's website; it was designed by the artist in 1983 in a building previously used as firehouse and church.
Now, I believe we have them both looking over their shoulder," Flavin said.
Louis Skyline Trade Show Consultant, Michael Flavin, has scheduled four (4) educational online webinars for Trade Show Marketers in the Saint Louis, Missouri area, during the months of October & November, 2011.
John Flavin, son of Pat Flavin, trainer of Kizzy O "She has a grand racing weight and ran well here after a long break in June.
Cadbury Unite convenor John Flavin said: "The pay deal has been overwhelmingly accepted.