flatus


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flatus

 [fla´tus]
1. gas or air in the gastrointestinal tract.
2. gas or air expelled through the anus.

fla·tus

(flā'tŭs),
Gas or air in the gastrointestinal tract that may be expelled through the anus.
[L. a blowing]

flatus

(flā′təs)
n.
Gas generated in or expelled from the digestive tract, especially the stomach or intestines.
A single expulsion of noxious gas per rectum; popularly called a fart

flatus

Medtalk noun Fart

fla·tus

(flā'tŭs)
Gas or air in the gastrointestinal tract that may be expelled through the anus.
[L. a blowing]

flatus

Gas discharged by way of the anus. The gas is a mixture of odourless nitrogen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane, and a varying quantity of hydrogen sulphide, which is said to smell like rotten eggs. Hydrogen and methane are both inflammable, but the risk to non-smokers is small. The average person farts about 20 times a day.

Flatus

Gas or air in the digestive tract.
Mentioned in: Charcoal, Activated

fla·tus

(flā'tŭs)
Gas or air in the gastrointestinal tract that may be expelled through the anus.
[L. a blowing]
References in periodicals archive ?
The study findings has shown reduced time to the first bowel sounds, defecation, passage of flatus, and feeling of hunger following chewing gum after the cesarean section.
Almost half (46%) of all women with symptoms reported incontinence of stool, and 38% reported incontinence of flatus. Approximately 46% reported onset of incontinence after delivery of their first child.
The over-the-counter product Beano, containing [alpha]-galactosidase derived from Aspergillus niger, claims to reduce flatus but does not help, he said.
Frequencies and Percentages of Postpartum Outcomes of Opt Women Immediately After Birth (N=142) Frequency Percentage (%) Pain at trauma site 118 83.1 Bleeding 5 3.5 Difficult posture 111 78.2 Difficult handling the baby 62 43.7 Difficult breast feeding 59 41.5 Urinary problems 39 27.5 Urinary incontinence 20 14.1 Flatus incontinence 23 16.2 Elimination difficulties 27 19 Fecal incontinence 0 0
Complications related to internal sphincterotomy like faecal soiling (1 patient) and incontinence of flatus (2 patients) were seen in our study for a short period of time.
of Patients Group 1 Group 2 Local Hematoma 0 0 Infection 6 1 Incontinence to Flatus 0 5 Incontinence to Stool 0 0 Table-4: Outcome Outcome No.
She was no longer passing flatus and there were no audible bowel sounds.
(9) however found no evidence of OASI on EAUS in their C/S patients post-delivery, although 36% had incontinence of flatus. The fact that we documented OASI post-delivery in the primigravidae irrespective of the mode of delivery further supports the theory that obstetric variables, such as the duration of labour, induction and augmentation of labour, instrumentation, the use of epidural and birth weight may be a factor in the development of OASI.
The two groups were significantly different in terms of time to flatus, time of intake of liquid diet, and length of hospital stay after surgery [Table 2].
In a retrospective study by Isbister and Sanea (17) in which tight seton placement for complex fistula was done in 47 patients, 36% of the patients had flatus incontinence, 8.5% had liquid fecal incontinence, and 2.3% had solid fecal incontinence.
Secondary outcomes were time to first flatus and stool, pain scores (according to the VSA), overall morbidity (according to the Dindo--Clavien classification) [14], reoperation rate, readmission rate, infectious complication rate within 30 days of hospital discharge, in-hospital mortality, and in-hospital costs.
Ogilvie's Paralytic syndrome ileus Impaired area Limited to colon Throughout the gut Bowel sounds Hyperactive/high- Always absent pitched/absent Nausea & vomiting Mild and More common inconstantly present Passing flatus Present Always ceased Passing stool Present/diarrhea/ Always ceased obstipation Table 2: Pre- and intraoperative measures taken in pregnant women to avoid adynamic ileus.