flatulence


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Related to flatulence: irritable bowel syndrome

flatulence

 [flat´u-lens]
excessive formation of gases in the stomach or intestine.

flat·u·lence

(flat'yū-lents),
Presence of an excessive amount of gas in the stomach and intestines.
[Mod. L. flatulentus, fr. L. flatus, a blowing, fr. flo, pp. flatus, to blow]

flatulence

(flăch′ə-ləns)
n.
1. The presence of excessive gas in the digestive tract.
2. Self-importance; pomposity.
Excess passage of noxious gas per rectum; flatulence is associated with legumes, nonabsorbable carbohydrates—e.g., fruits, vegetables, lactose, wheat—cryptococcal infection, and iron and vitamin E deficiencies; in most subjects, CH4 production is low, but increases dramatically in colorectal cancer, reflecting a change in flora
Management Gastric gas may respond to simethicone; intestinal gas may respond to activated charcoal

flatulence

GI disease Excess passage of noxious volatiles per anus; borborygmi are associated with legumes, nonabsorbable carbohydrates–eg, fruits, vegetables, lactose, wheat, cryptococcal infection, and iron and vitamin E deficiencies; in most subjects, CH4 production is low, but ↑ dramatically in colorectal cancer, reflecting a change in flora World record farting Bernard Clemmens, London, UK, sustained a fart for a record 2 mins, 42 secs Management A fabis abstinentis; gastric gas may respond to simethicone, intestinal gas to activated charcoal. See Legumes.

flat·u·lence

(flat'yū-lĕns)
Presence of an excessive amount of gas in the stomach and intestines.

flatulence

A sense of fullness and discomfort in the upper abdomen associated with a desire to belch, and usually caused by air swallowing. See also AEROPHAGY.

Flatulence

Excess gas in the digestive tract.
Mentioned in: Antigas Agents

flat·u·lence

(flat'yū-lĕns)
Presence of an excessive amount of gas in the stomach and intestines.
References in periodicals archive ?
The need for it may be recognised by the presence of indigestion with sour eructations, flatulence, and abdominal distension not relieved by eructation or the passage of flatus.
Gastrointestinal symptoms (flatulence, bloating, diarrhea, and abdominal pain) were rated using a scale of 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe [14], and compliance to study food intake and stool frequency were recorded in a daily diary.
Few scientists at the University of Exeter have developed a new compound - AP39, using hydrogen sulfide, present in rotten eggs and flatulence. The compound, when delivered in very small amounts to the right places inside the cells, can offer health benefits in a range of diseases such as diabetes, arthritis, heart failure, dementia and aging.
An added benefit, the fermentation of this prebiotic does not cause flatulence, as typical prebiotics have been known to do.
She recently admitted that being pregnant has made her parp a lot - taking to Twitter to say: "The average person expels flatulence 15 times each day!
Plenty of flatulence jokes, bad puns and witty comments for 9 to 13-year-old boys.
According to a recipe obtained from the Lotus Buddhist Monastery in Hawaii, this papaya-based product has a wide range of indications, including chronic constipation, chronic diarrhoea, flatulence and heartburn.
calls for tax on livestock emissions: Livestock should be taxed to reduce the contribution made by their flatulence to greenhouse gas emissions, the United Nations says in a new report.
The legislation passed (hold your breath) is one that appropriates $5 million to study the effects on the ozone layer from flatulence in cows.
The Fuhrer was said by of one his agents to suffer from flatulence and indigestion brought on by over-eating.
Foods with a high proportion of carbohydrates cannot be broken down and absorbed in the intestine and will cause flatulence. Slimming foods that contain sorbitol or fructose, as well as fruit like apples and fruit juices also cause flatulence.