flatline


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flatline

(flăt′līn′)
intr.v. flat·lined, flat·lining, flat·lines
1. To show a horizontal line on the monitor of an electrocardiogram or an electroencephalogram, indicating no electrical activity.
2. Informal To die.
adj.
Being or relating to an electrocardiogram or an electroencephalogram that indicates no electrical activity.

flatline

An informal term for the state of a person whose medical monitoring equipment shows a flat line rather than the normal peaks and troughs. Such a person has recently died or is very near to death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although many companies continue to shrink or flatline, NexGen Digital Inc.
was using an Easton FlatLine arrow that day, and boy am I glad I was.
If you're looking for speed, the new Easton FlatLine Surgical shafts can help.
It stuck with its forecast that prices would flatline over the course of 2010.
Joe McCain is 17, restless and bored with the flatline tedium of a life that seems like it's going nowhere, and a best mate he's drifting apart from.
With Alice-like temerity, the narrator moves about the dreamscape, his journey recorded in flatline prose delivered without exclamation even as the narrator meets one after another mysterious, inexplicably threatening eccentrics who are distorted by carnal itches and/or by unspecified emotional woundings.
Deeply plunging into the depths of woe, flatline depression grips me and weakens my soul.
And so the exhibition's pulselike power gave way to a flatline in this viewer's brain.
Cheese's favorite author is the deceased EP, "Charles" Penrose and it is his fixation with Penrose that pushes Cheese's discovery of FLATLINE, a direct phone connection to the dead.
New works included Without Walls, choreographed by Ron De Jesus, Flatline by Harrison McEldowney (both world premieres), and Passomezzo by Ohad Naharin.
And "experts from across the political spectrum" were proven wrong: The health care cost trend went flatline in the 1994-96 period.