flare-up

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flare-up

(flâr′ŭp′)
n.
1. An outburst or eruption: a flare-up of anger.
2. A sudden worsening of the symptoms of a disease or condition: a flare-up of eczema.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flare-up

Medtalk An acute worsening of a condition
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
People with a COPD flare-up who have a low CRP level in the blood appear to receive little benefit from antibiotic treatment.
The unpredictable flare-ups of Crohn's disease can be hard to cope with emotionally and practically, so it may help to discuss your condition with your friends and family if you're struggling.
* Certain foods: Some people with psoriasis note that certain foods and beverages trigger their flare-ups. Tomato- and pepper-based products and acidic or alcoholic beverages may cause flare-ups.
According to these proportional responses, it was found out that male house officers were more confident than female in various steps like diagnosis (p-value, 0.01), achieving anesthesia (p-value, 0.02), working length determination using electronic apex locator (p-value, 0.004), cleaning and shaping of canal (p-value, 0.04), placing an inter-appointment dressing according to case type (p-value, 0.02), managing flare-ups (p-value, 0.002) and assessing quality of root canal obturation (p-value, 0.002).
She will promise Jack that she isn't going to drink, and the only true concern is her flare-ups. However, after she leaves, a new concern could reveal itself.
Treatment was initiated within seven days of the onset of a flare-up, with evaluations made at baseline, at the end of treatment (six weeks), and after a six-week observation period (12 weeks).
Often people with eczema will have breakouts or flare-ups on eyelids, eyebrows, behind the ears or even on cheeks, notes Amy Gordinier-Regan, chief executive officer of Skinfix.
The Director-General said that anticipating further flare-ups, WHO has kept "hundreds of our own experienced staff in the three countries, ready to contribute to the kind of emergency response needed to quickly interrupt transmission chains."
Indeed, Sierra Leone saw a small Ebola flare-up in January, which the WHO declared over the same day it announced the two cases in neighboring Guinea.
"But we also expect the potential and frequency of those flare-ups to decrease over time.
"WHO stresses ongoing risk of flare-ups due to the re-emergence of the virus throughout 2016 due to persistence of the virus in the survivor population," a spokesman said.
However, WHO said "the job is not over." More flare-ups are expected and that strong surveillance and response systems will be critical in the months to come.