flame photometry


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flame photometry

Etymology: L, flagrare, to burn; Gk, phos, light, metron, measure
measurement of the wavelength of light rays emitted by excited metallic electrons exposed to the heat energy of a flame, used to identify characteristics in clinical specimens of body fluids. The intensity of the emitted light is proportional to the concentration of atoms in the fluid, and a quantitative analysis can be made on that basis. In the clinical laboratory, flame photometry was once used to measure sodium, potassium, and lithium levels but is no longer used routinely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rapid determination of potassium and sodium in plant materials and soil extracts by flame photometry.
concentrations to agree with the findings using the flame photometry.
The N content was estimated by Kjeldahl method and the P and K content were determined by Mo-Sb Colorimetry and Flame photometry method respectively [19].
Additional refinements in chemical analysis came with the development of flame photometry and its application in the late 1940s for analysis of sodium and potassium by Eubank and Bogue (15).
For K analysis plant material was digested in a 3:1 nitric: perchloric acid mixture and the K concentration of the plant digest was determined by flame photometry Pal et al.
Most laboratories analyze samples for K concentration using either flame photometry or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy.
Basically, similar corrections are made, such as those made to convert directly read ISE results to values obtained with flame photometry (7-9).
Since 1982 calcium can be measured directly for whole blood, serum and plasma by electrochemical potentiometric analysers based on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) rather than by flame photometry of diluted plasma samples.
Its 29 chapters covered principles of spectrophotometry, flame photometry, gasometric techniques, electrophoresis, accuracy, precision, control charts, significant figures (still abused by most authors and journals), and normal values.
Corrections were carried out by introduction of slope and intercept values established with the flame photometry reference method (Eppendorf apparatus) for calibration of each new batch of slides.
Similarly, the introduction of flame photometry and its rapid and precise estimation of serum K