flagellant


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A person who willingly subjects himself to whipping or scourging, as a religious penitent, or as a sexual masochist

flagellant

(flăj′ĕ-lănt) [L. flagellum, whip]
1. Pert. to a flagellum.
2. Pert. to stroking in massage.
3. One who practices flagellation.

flagellant

A person who whips himself, or who is whipped by another, especially for purposes of sexual arousal and gratification.
References in periodicals archive ?
(52) Curiosities of Flagellation: A Series of Incidents and Facts collected by an Amateur Flagellant, and published in 5 volumes (London, 1875).
Best Production Design was awarded to Austin Tan for Penitensya, a masterful story about a flagellant embedded in the present-day crisis of extrajudicial killings, the tyranny of religion and state a troubling concern for all Filipino filmmakers.
In the final phase of my argument, I turn to Algernon Charles Swinburne's depiction of a flagellant community to explore how the ritual intensifies into mutilation, rupturing the circuit of recurrence and redrawing the possibilities of nationhood.
In the 1260s, a first wave of foundations of devotional confraternities took place -- the flagellant confraternities or confraternities of discipline.
Penitential processions of various types likewise may be seen as extending experience into the realm of the liminal, nowhere more so than in the case of the notorious processions of lay flagellant confraternities (flagellanti) in Italy where laude were sung as the participants processed through the streets in their distinctive garments with hoods and open backs, the latter designed to receive their whips or scourges, sometimes with metal imbedded in the ends of the leather thongs so that their flesh would be literally bloodied.
At Eton and Westminster there was little the teachers could do to stop older boys from producing magazines, though Robert Southey, the future Poet Laureate, was expelled from Westminster for denouncing corporal punishment in The Flagellant (1792); but there is nothing to indicate that school staffs offered any sort of encouragement.
Flagellant groups in Italy, French and German territories and the Low Countries, Brethren of the Free Spirit and the Lollards in England all shared a belief in the imminent end of the world.(4) Heiko Oberman has described the eve of the European reformations in terms of a "nascent apocalyptic mood" predicated upon the apocalyptic texture of late medieval thought.
"Beavis and Butt-head came along at just the right time for comic rebel." Actually, they came along at a time when MTV desperately needed to change its positioning--from cloying paternalist to winking flagellant.
Joudrey points out the surprising number of ballads in the pornographic journal The Pearl and reads these as well as Swinburne's flagellant poems as political interventions that resist nineteenth-century literary histories as well as established power and authority.
The flagellant confraternities flourished in Spain in great numbers (with particular involvement from the Franciscans), and the devotion to the example of Christ as the Vir Dolorum often led its members to perform acts of self-mortification that were judged excessive by the Church hierarchy; (30) in Salamanca, the medieval institution of the 'Cofradia de Jesus Flagelado' still exists today.
How much further than the mere distances of time seemed to separate the old man, taking his daily walk across Wimbledon Common and peering affectionately into the pink baby faces in the prams, from the nerve-jerked young pursuer of the pinkly naked Mazeppa - Adah Isaacs Menken - the self-poisoning alcoholic, and the submissive, brothel-hopping flagellant, who had been rescued into the safe dullness of longevity by fussy-bossy Theodore Watts-Dunton.
Its international conferences on the flagellant movement produced two sizeable and excellent collections of articles on the movement and the confraternities that were touched by or arose from it - Il movimento dei disciplinati (1962, rpt.