fixation

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fixation

 [fik-sa´shun]
1. the act or operation of holding, suturing, or fastening in a fixed position.
2. the condition of being held in a fixed position.
3. in psychiatry, a term with two related but distinct meanings: (a) arrest of development at a particular stage (if this is temporary it is a normal reaction to difficulties, but if continued it is a cause of emotional problems); and (b) a close and suffocating attachment to some person, especially a childhood figure such as a parent.
4. in microscopy, the treatment of material so that its structure can be examined in greater detail with minimal alteration of the normal state, and also to provide information concerning the chemical properties (as of cell constituents) by interpretation of fixation reactions.
5. in chemistry, the process whereby a substance is removed from the gaseous or solution phase and localized, as in carbon dioxide or nitrogen fixation.
6. in ophthalmology, direction of the gaze so that the visual image of the object falls on the fovea centralis.
7. in film processing, the chemical removal of all unexposed and undeveloped silver compounds of the film emulsion, as on x-ray films.
complement fixation see complement fixation.
intermaxillary fixation (IMF) a technique used to stabilize a fractured jaw; the teeth are wired or banded together. Extreme caution must be exercised to insure that oral secretions and vomitus are not aspirated as the patient is unable to expectorate any fluids. Antiemetics are often administered to prevent vomiting. Wire cutters should be kept with the patient at all times.
Teeth wired in intermaxillary fixation. From Ignatavicius et al., 1995.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fix·a·tion

(fik-sā'shŭn),
1. The condition of being firmly attached or set.
2. In histology, the rapid killing of tissue elements and their preservation and hardening to retain as nearly as possible the same relationship they had in the living body. Synonym(s): fixing
3. In chemistry, the conversion of a gas into solid or liquid form by chemical reactions, with or without the help of living tissue.
4. In psychoanalysis, the quality of being firmly attached to a particular person, object, or period in one's development.
5. In physiologic optics, the coordinated positioning and accommodation of both eyes that result in bringing or maintaining a sharp image of a stationary or moving object on the fovea of each eye.
[L. figo, pp. fixus, to fix, fasten]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fixation

(fĭk-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of fixing or fixating: the fixation of nitrogen by bacteria.
2. An obsessive preoccupation.
3. Psychology A strong attachment to a person or thing, manifested in an immature or pathological way.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fixation

Physical examination The immobility of a relatively well-circumscribed mass in soft tissue, as is typical of breast CA. See Postural fixation Psychiatry The arrest of psychosocial development; fixation may be considered pathologic, if intense.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fix·a·tion

(fik-sā'shŭn)
1. The condition of being firmly attached or set.
2. histology The rapid killing of tissue elements and their preservation and hardening to retain as nearly as possible the same relations they had in the living body.
Synonym(s): fixing.
3. chemistry The conversion of a gas into solid or liquid form by chemical reactions, with or without the help of living tissue.
4. psychoanalysis The quality of being firmly attached to a particular person or object or period in one's development.
5. physiologic optics The coordinated positioning and accommodation of both eyes that results in bringing or maintaining a sharp image of a stationary or moving object on the fovea of each eye.
[L. figo, pp. fixus, to fix, fasten]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fixation

1. Any method of holding something in a fixed position, especially holding the broken fragments of a bone in proper alignment so that they will heal together in the correct positional relationship.
2. The accurate alignment of one or both eyes on a small object.
3. A psychoanalytic term meaning an excessively close attachment to an object or person, of a kind appropriate to an earlier, immature, stage of development. See also EXTERNAL FIXATOR.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fixation

a genetical situation where all members of a population are HOMOZYGOUS for one particular ALLELE of a gene, so that no alternative alleles of that LOCUS exist in the population. fixation often occurs in small populations. See also EXTINCTION (2).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

fixation

The act of directing the eye to a given object so that its image is formed on the foveola.
anomalous fixation See eccentric fixation.
fixation axis See fixation axis.
bifoveal fixation See bifixation.
binocular fixation Fixation on an object with both eyes simultaneously.
fixation disparity See retinal disparity; fusional movements.
fixation disparity unit, Mallett See Mallett fixation disparity unit.
eccentric fixation Monocular condition in which the image of the point of fixation is not formed on the foveola. In this condition, the patients feel that they are looking straight at the object stimulating the non-foveolar retinal area and the visual acuity of that eye is reduced. The condition occurs most commonly in strabismic amblyopia but can also occur when the fovea has been destroyed by some pathological process. Syn. anomalous fixation. See Haidinger's brushes; occlusion treatment; penalization; pleoptics; Maxwell's spot; after-image transfer test; eccentric viewing; Visuscope.
foveal fixation Normal fixation in which the image of an object falls on the foveola.
line of fixation See fixation axis.
fixation movements See fixation movements.
parafoveal fixation Fixation by a retinal area located outside the fovea but within the macula (or fovea centralis ), i.e. within 5 degrees of the central visual field. It may occur in amblyopia.
plane of fixation See plane of regard.
point of fixation Point in space upon which the eye is directed, either monocularly or binocularly. If there is no eccentric fixation, the image of that point is formed on the foveola. Syn. object of regard. See point of regard.
fixation reflex See fixation reflex.
fixation response Eye movement aimed at placing the image of a point of fixation on the foveola.
voluntary fixation Conscious fixation of an object as distinguished from the fixation reflex.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

fix·a·tion

(fik-sā'shŭn)
The condition of being firmly attached or set.
[L. figo, pp. fixus, to fix, fasten]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides this, fixation times, saccade times and saccade path in the free-view task are negatively correlated with depressive symptoms, while the mean fixation duration is positively correlated with depressive symptoms.
The initial high number of reflectivity AOI fixation counts in period 1 resulted from using these data to assess storm intensity.
The risk of the depressed fracture from pin fixation has to be balanced by the benefits of rigid fixation, and the risks of using other head rests, especially for prolonged operations, where there is a risk of skin damage by pressure from a headrest, such as a horseshoe headrest.
Although the findings render it very probable that COG fixations can indeed be regarded as a correlate for more efficient perceptual encoding, the evidence for that claim is still quite indirect: firstly, because the comparisons relied on different groups of individuals that already differed in the central performance measure (experts versus novices) and second, because the effects of more efficient coding during COG fixations were not independently assessed.
The right of distribution is the right to authorize the making available to the public of the original and copies of the performance fixed in an audiovisual fixation through sale or other transfer of ownership.
Fixation duration, in particular, belongs to the processing-depth component, whereas fixations concern the global aspect of attention distribution.
After definitive pelvic ring fixation, a follow-up CT was performed within 1 week to indirectly evaluate the decompression quality.
The fixation time and fixation count data were obtained using Begaze (iView software).
After development of the polyaxial screw-rod system, cervical fixation surgery has now become easier to perform.
Eye movements in the problem-solving stage of the interactive problem--(a) eye fixations and saccades of a high-performing student, (b) eye fixations and saccades of a low- performing student.
Regarding the reduction and fixation method, additional fixation with a miniscrew, K wire, soft wire, and hook plate has been reported [3].
The questionnaire composed of 5 sections, included demographic data, decision making in the approach to suspected TT, practice of fixation of the contralateral testis and timing of fixation, routine practice in case of negative exploration of TT and, the fixation technique and preferred suture used.