five tastes

five tastes

pungent, sweet, sour, bitter and salty; a classification for Chinese herbal medicines.
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You're introduced to the five tastes, and how cooking highlights and enhances some of those tastes.
Salt, on the other hand -- which enhances flavour and tenderises protein -- is one of the five tastes our taste receptors recognise, along with sweet, sour, bitter and umami.
According to Sano, who grew up in Tokyo before moving to London and opening sushi restaurant Suzu, the basic rules of Shoku-Iku include the Buddhist-inspired Power of Five to boost variety: eating foods from five groups (grains, vegetables, fruits, protein and dairy) that appeal to your five senses, that contain five tastes (sweet, sour, bitter, salt and the savoury 'umami'), and which aim to reflect five colours (green/ blue, red/orange, white, black/brown, yellow).
As well as selling pieces of the cakes made on the day - at PS5 for five tastes - there will also be a raffle to win a hamper of goodies donated by businesses in Cardiff, including Wally's Delicatessen, Bully's restaurant, Arteas Cafe, Chapter Arts Centre and Barrett & Coe photographers.
The children were given "taste strips" - pieces of filter paper - which had different concentrations of the five tastes on them, plus two blank strips.
The authors suggest that this blunted ability to distinguish all five tastes of bitter, sweet, salty, sour, and umami (savoury) may prompt them to eat larger quantities of food in a bid to register the same taste sensation.
There is also an emphasis on balanced food, the five tastes and so on.
We know that the human tongue can detect five tastes -- sweet, salt, sour, bitter and umami (a taste for identifying protein rich foods).
Another is ketchup, which balances all five tastes perfectly and is the reason most Americans like it, according to Kasabian.
The group estimated that although fat itself does not have a strong taste, it serves to complement and deepen the other five tastes.
Sheila Dillon explores the taste of bitterness, the most intriguing of the five tastes according to Sybil Kapoor's New Taste cookbook.
But I feel the key to creating scrumptious food is understanding the relationship of the five tastes and their effect upon us.