diagnosis

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diagnosis

 [di″ag-no´sis]
1. determination of the nature of a cause of a disease.
2. a concise technical description of the cause, nature, or manifestations of a condition, situation, or problem. adj., adj diagnos´tic.
clinical diagnosis diagnosis based on signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings during life.
differential diagnosis the determination of which one of several diseases may be producing the symptoms.
medical diagnosis diagnosis based on information from sources such as findings from a physical examination, interview with the patient or family or both, medical history of the patient and family, and clinical findings as reported by laboratory tests and radiologic studies.
nursing diagnosis see nursing diagnosis.
physical diagnosis diagnosis based on information obtained by inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation.
diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG) a system of classification or grouping of patients according to medical diagnosis for purposes of paying hospitalization costs. In 1983, amendments to Social Security contained a prospective payment plan for most Medicare inpatient services in the United States. The payment plan was intended to control rising health care costs by paying a fixed amount per patient. The program of DRG reimbursement was based on the premise that similar medical diagnoses would generate similar costs for hospitalization. Therefore, all patients admitted for a surgical procedure such as hernia repair would be charged the same amount regardless of actual cost to the hospital. If a patient's hospital bill should total less than the amount paid by Medicare, the hospital is allowed to keep the difference. If, however, a patient's bill is more than that reimbursed by Medicare for a specific diagnosis, the hospital must absorb the difference in cost. See also appendix of Diagnosis-Related Groups.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·ag·no·sis (Dx),

(dī'ag-nō'sis),
The determination of the nature of a disease, injury, or congenital defect.
Synonym(s): diacrisis
[G. diagnōsis, a deciding]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diagnosis

(dī′əg-nō′sĭs)
n. pl. diagno·ses (-sēz)
1. Medicine
a. The act or process of identifying or determining the nature and cause of a disease or injury through evaluation of patient history, examination, and review of laboratory data.
b. The opinion derived from such an evaluation.
2.
a. A critical analysis of the nature of something.
b. The conclusion reached by such analysis.
3. Biology A brief description of the distinguishing characteristics of an organism, as for taxonomic classification.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

diagnosis

The process of identifying a disease based on a person’s signs and symptoms, which may be gleaned from a simple physical examination or require ancillary testing, lab work, imaging studies, etc.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

diagnosis

Decision-making The process of determining, through examination and analysis, the nature of a Pt's illness; the process of identifying a disease by signs and symptoms; the label for a particular condition. See Computer-assisted diagnosis, Differential diagnosis, Deferred diagnosis, Definitive diagnosis, Direct diagnosis, Electrodiagnosis, Indirect diagnosis, Leading diagnosis, Misdiagnosis, Primary diagnosis, Secondary diagnosis, Wastebasket diagnosis, Working diagnosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·ag·no·sis

(dī-ăg-nō'sis)
The determination of the nature of a disease, injury, or congenital defect.
See also: nursing diagnosis
[G. diagnōsis, a deciding]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diagnosis

The art and science of identifying the disease causing a particular set of clinical signs and symptoms. Differential diagnosis is the selection of one from a list of diseases that present in a similar way. From the Greek dia , through, and gnoskein , to perceive.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

diagnosis

  1. a statement that distinguishes the particular TAXON in question from other similar taxa, in terms of the most important characters.
  2. identification of a particular pathological or physiological condition deduced from characteristic symptoms, or the procedure to achieve such an identification.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

diagnosis

1. Term that indicates the disease (e.g. pulmonary tuberculosis) or the refractive error (e.g. compound myopic astigmatism) that a person has. 2. The art of determining a disease or visual anomaly based on the signs, symptoms and tests.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

di·ag·no·sis

(Dx) (dī-ăg-nō'sis)
The determination of the nature of a disease, injury, or congenital defect.
[G. diagnōsis, a deciding]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about diagnosis

Q. How is the diagnosis of autism made? My friend has a child who is suspected to have autism. I wanted to find out more about making the diagnosis of autism.

A. Diagnosing autism is not an easy task, especially when there are several other conditions that might confuse the clinician with this disorder or spectrum of disorders. The child usually has several symptoms that suggest an autistic disorder, such as impaired social behavior. Several diagnostic instruments (tests) are available. Two are commonly used in autism research: the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is a semistructured parent interview, and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) uses observation and interaction with the child. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) is used widely in clinical environments to assess severity of autism based on observation of children.
A pediatrician commonly performs a preliminary investigation by taking developmental history and physically examining the child.. If warranted, diagnosis and evaluations are conducted with help from ASD specialists, observing and assessing cognitive, communication, family, and other factors

Q. Is the diagnosis correct? I have been diagnosed bipolar and was previously diagnosed with depression and ADHD how I know the diagnosis is correct this time?

A. a psychologist/psychiatrist should also have the possibility with a questionary to detect if you have bipolar disorder and/or adhd. i have both and live with it since i am a child. i had my first "out-of-control"-crisis with 29 years. in the meantime i am 46 (in two days) and i still live! i had also many times the wish to make suicide, but this is the worst solution. do you live alone? do you have a dog? do you have a job? what are your talents? what do you love to do in life? write it down and look what you could put on a focus. what are the things you do daily that allows you to stop thinking of all your trouble? write it down. to make a puzzle? play chess with your neighbor? to chat online? you only can collect what could help you in such cases to keep the bad thoughts you have away from yourself. there is always at least one good solution. i give you here some ideas. never give up! thank you

Q. Who was the first person to be diagnosed with ADHD? Here is a question which I find very difficult to get an answer. Who was the first person to be diagnosed with ADHD? Take it easy to answer me my new friend. Thanks in advance.

More discussions about diagnosis
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References in periodicals archive ?
Among hospitalizations for a first-listed diagnosis of Crohn's disease in 2013,3.9% were for small bowel resection, 12.8% for colorectal resection, and 2.0% for fistula repair.
Stable trends for a first-listed Crohn's disease diagnosis from 2003 to 2013 suggest that the 4.3% annual increase reported for a first-listed diagnosis from 1998 to 2004 (3) has not continued.
From 1988 through 1992, epilepsy was the first-listed diagnosis for an estimated 466,000 hospitalizations; the age-adjusted hospitalization rate was 37 hospitalizations per 100,000 persons (Table 1).
From 1980 through 1987, the hospital discharge rate for asthma as the first-listed diagnosis increased 6%, from 174.6 to 184.8 per 100,000 population (Figure 2).
The proportion of all septicemia diagnoses in which septicemia was the principal or first-listed diagnosis increased from 33.5% to 40.5%.