first-generation cephalosporin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

first-generation cephalosporin

Any of a group of cephalosporin antibiotics capable of killing gram-positive cocci such as Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, and some aerobic gram-negative rods. These agents are used to treat skin and soft tissue infections, uncomplicated respiratory tract infections, and urinary tract infections. Examples of first-generation cephalosporins are cephalothin, cephaloridine, cephapirin, cefazolin, cephradine, cephalexin, and cefadroxil.
See also: cephalosporin
References in periodicals archive ?
In the overall group of 611 children with UTI, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was prescribed for 61%, amoxicillin for 29%, nitrofurantoin for 7%, and other antimicrobials including first-generation cephalosporins for the other 3%.
This is a good time to mention that there is potential cephalosporin cross-sensitivity in patients with a true penicillin allergy (4% to 10% of cases) that has been observed predominantly with first-generation cephalosporins.
4% for first-generation cephalosporins and "nearly nil" for certain later-generation agents, which he defined as cefdinir, cef-podoxime, and cefuroxime.
When the first-generation cephalosporins cephaloridine and cephalothin were introduced in the 1960s, allergic and anaphylactic reactions were reported in patients with previous allergic reactions to penicillins.
For example, first-generation cephalosporins have activity against most strains of MSSA but nearly all MRSA isolates are resistant.