first-generation antipsychotic


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first-generation antipsychotic

A neuroleptic drug. They treat psychotic disorders and other psychiatric diseases. Side effects include extrapyramidal (Parkinsonian) reactions. Synonym: conventional antipsychotic See: neuroleptic (1)
See also: antipsychotic
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
If second-generation antipsychotics are avoided because of their potential diabetes risk, and first-generation antipsychotics are preferred, this could result in poor adherence to the treatment medication.
Recent reports show that first-generation antipsychotics are less expensive than the newer drugs.
The absence of NMS history and of dystonia or dyskinesia phenomena in the context of neuroleptic impregnation --despite the fact that this patient followed numerous therapeutic schemes, including both atypical antipsychotics and first-generation antipsychotics --made the differential diagnosis even more difficult.
Which of the following is one of the symptoms associated with the extrapyramidal effects of the first-generation antipsychotics?
In addition, patients with tardive dyskinesia at baseline who were receiving second generation antipsychotics were less likely than patients receiving first-generation antipsychotics to have tardive dyskinesia symptoms at 6 months.
Freeman, a German study published recently showed no significant difference between rates of major malformations between those exposed to first-generation antipsychotics or second-generation atypicals during the first trimester (J.
First-generation antipsychotics should not be used in this way, however, as they raise the risk of motor adverse effects excessively.
Among research applications rejected for funding by NIMH in recent years were proposals to study serotonin receptor genes in schizophrenia, a new drug to treat schizophrenia, the state of dysphoric mania in bipolar disorder, and the cost-effectiveness of second-generation antipsychotic drugs compared to first-generation antipsychotics. None of these proposals were apparently considered to be as valuable as the proposal to study romantic relationships.
(1) Unlike first-generation antipsychotics, SGAs do not cause affective blunting, and are effective at treating depressive symptoms; however, depressive symptoms can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from negative symptoms.
The most potent antipsychotic dopamine D2 receptor antagonists are risperidone and paliperidone, followed by haloperidol and most other first-generation antipsychotics.
Numerous studies have been conducted in order to clarify this issue, the first of them showing that first-generation antipsychotics causes an increased cardiovascular risk.