first-degree relative

first-degree relative

One's mother, father, or biologically related sister(s) or brother(s). People are more likely to share potentially inherited conditions with first-degree relatives than with other more distantly related family members.
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He added:"The risk is even higher if that relative was diagnosed with cancer when he or she was younger than 45 years and if more than one first-degree relative was affected.
There are non-modifiable risk factors such as; age-incidence and death rates for colorectal cancer increase with age (50 years and older); gender; colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates are higher in men than in women; family history first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or child) with colorectal cancer or polyps.
However, the number of study participants with ovarian cancer and a history of douching was small, and the study also did not account for some of the health and lifestyle factors that may influence ovarian cancer risk, such as a family history of ovarian cancer, more than one first-degree relative with breast cancer, and smoking.
In patients with thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin, a family history of nonmedullary thyroid cancer in one first-degree relative is associated with more aggressive disease.
Under a proposal tabled by AKEL, the owner of a property in foreclosure, or a first-degree relative, may take part in the auction.
Having a first-degree relative with breast or prostate cancer was associated with an elevated adjusted hazard ratio of breast cancer of 1.
Women who have one first-degree relative (mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer approximately doubles a woman's risk.
While this makes no difference to the patient, it has major significance to biologic relatives, as each first-degree relative is at increased risk for carrying a mutation, and therefore for SUD.
If a man is at high risk, including African-American patients and those who have had a first-degree relative diagnosed with prostate cancer at a young age, discussions should start at the age of 45.
The researchers examined 7-day outcomes in 200 infants with acute bronchiolitis who were at a high risk of asthma, as determined by having at least one first-degree relative with either asthma or eczema.
Definition of high-risk individual: single first-degree relative with CRC or advanced adenomas diagnosed at less than 60 years of age, or 2 first-degree relatives with CRC or advanced adenomas.
An example of a vulnerable person is someone with a first-degree relative with psychosis, "the highest risk factor for schizophrenia," said Dr.