firedamp


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fire·damp

(fīr'damp),
Methane or other light hydrocarbons forming an explosive mixture when mixed with 7 or 8 volumes of air.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

firedamp

A colourless and odorless flammable gas, primarily composed of methane (60%), nitrogen and carbon dioxide, which is found in coal mines, putting miners at risk for death by asphyxia or explosion.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The connector is designed with armoured cables, which are certified for use in ha-zardous firedamp areas.
DON'T BRIAN On December 23, 1885, an underground explosion killed 81 men; it was probably caused by a Comet lamp, a naked light lamp, igniting firedamp. William Thomas was awarded the Medal for Valour for leading the rescue operation.
A total of 95 men and boys died in this major accident which was believed to have been caused by methane gas, also known as firedamp, coming into contact with a naked flame.
It was caused by a build up of firedamp (methane) gas being ignited.
2 -- Cooper Industries has introduced a range of explosion-proof connectors, which simplifies the commissioning and decommissioning of electrical equipment installed in hazardous firedamp environments, including underground mines.
However, Dincer said the cause of the blast could be firedamp.
During the 18th century, miners worked by the light of a candle, a practice that became increasingly dangerous as mines grew deeper and exposed workers to explosive firedamp gas.
Firedamp (gas exctracted in deep coal mines) is composed of 2-3 vol.
But within 30 minutes, two explosions of firedamp ripped through the mine, the force of which swept along the drifts and workings, and up the shaft with incredible power.
Before then, miners used lamps with open flames which often ignited flammable gasses such as "firedamp" - methane.