fire ant


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Related to fire ant: Red imported fire ant

fire ant

any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery, burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.
See also: solenopsin A.

fire ant

n.
Any of various ants of the genus Solenopsis that build large mounds and can inflict a painful sting, especially S. invicta, native to South America and naturalized in the southern United States.
Any of a family of omnivorous nonwinged stinging hymenopteran arthropods that attack people, livestock, crops, electric insulation, etc., of which there are 280+ species world-wide; fire ants inject venom, causing intense (’fire-like’) burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, to sterile pustules within 24 hours to severe chest pain, nausea, severe sweating, dyspnoea, oedema, or slurred speech, to anaphylaxis-related death
Management Avoid if possible; prompt topical steroids, antihistamines, epinephrine—Epipen, repeat if needed
Environmental management—fighting fire (ant) with fire Phoridae is a family of small, hump-backed flies, some species of which—e.g., Pseudacteon tricuspis and Pseudacteon curvatus—parasitise the red fire ant in its native South America. It is being introduced in Arkansas and Texas and appears to be successful in controlling the ants

fire ant

Medical entomology A nonwinged hymenopteran arthropod which is omnivorous, attacking livestock, crops, electric insulation; the FA injects a venom, causing intense burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, a sterile pustule within 24 hrs to anaphylaxis-related death

fire ant

(fīr ant)
Any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), is a stinging, invasive ant from South America that has plagued the southern US since the 1930s.
Relatedness among co-existing queens within polygyne colonies of a Texas population of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.
'Fire ants have strong adaptations to an environment so it is important to block their entrance from the borders.
To start off, fire ants already have a genetic advantage.
Conservation of biodiversity in an area impacted by the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
Red imported fire ants have infested 300 million acres since arriving in the United States in the 1930s.
Desiccation resistance in populations of the red imported fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
This detox trick could help explain why these crazy ants can vanquish the red imported fire ants Solenopsis invicta, which have been spreading across the southern United States since they invaded more than 70 years ago.
Fire ants have a burning sting that comes from their venom.
Elevated levels of macro- and micronutrients in fire ant mounds may provide enhanced growth to plants located in ant-occupied soils.
The name, fire ant, has become one of those generic terms, referring to any number of small, aggressive ants whose painful bite seems out of proportion to its tiny body.
Fadamiro's research may result in a new way to control the fire ant population in the United States.