fire ant


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Related to fire ant: Red imported fire ant

fire ant

any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery, burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.
See also: solenopsin A.

fire ant

n.
Any of various ants of the genus Solenopsis that build large mounds and can inflict a painful sting, especially S. invicta, native to South America and naturalized in the southern United States.
Any of a family of omnivorous nonwinged stinging hymenopteran arthropods that attack people, livestock, crops, electric insulation, etc., of which there are 280+ species world-wide; fire ants inject venom, causing intense (’fire-like’) burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, to sterile pustules within 24 hours to severe chest pain, nausea, severe sweating, dyspnoea, oedema, or slurred speech, to anaphylaxis-related death
Management Avoid if possible; prompt topical steroids, antihistamines, epinephrine—Epipen, repeat if needed
Environmental management—fighting fire (ant) with fire Phoridae is a family of small, hump-backed flies, some species of which—e.g., Pseudacteon tricuspis and Pseudacteon curvatus—parasitise the red fire ant in its native South America. It is being introduced in Arkansas and Texas and appears to be successful in controlling the ants

fire ant

Medical entomology A nonwinged hymenopteran arthropod which is omnivorous, attacking livestock, crops, electric insulation; the FA injects a venom, causing intense burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, a sterile pustule within 24 hrs to anaphylaxis-related death

fire ant

(fīr ant)
Any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.

fire

naked flame.

fire ant
Solenopsis invicta; bites can cause severe conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers.
fire brand
see brand.
fire engine practice
see fire engine practice.
fire fish
members of the fish family Scorpaenidae, or scorpion fish which cause intense skin irritation.
fire injury
fire retardant
chemicals used to proof timber or fabric against fire. Many of these agents are poisonous. The best known are polybrominated and polychlorinated biphenyls.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are considerable variations in the venom alkaloid chemistry among different castes (workers, soldiers, and female alates) in some fire ant species (Brand et al.
We look forward to working with all our stakeholders and the South East Queensland community to eradicate fire ants once and for all.
Effect of the red imported fire ant on cotton aphid population density and predation of bollworm and beet armyworm eggs.
Other countries where red imported fire ants are a problem, such as Australia, Taiwan, and New Zealand, have expressed interest in this technology.
Critical thermal limits and locomotor activity of the red imported fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
Caption: The red imported fire ant (left) dabs droplets of potent venom from its rear onto enemies, but its opponent, a tawny crazy ant (right), detoxifies the venom with an acid rubdown.
10 for all tests to increase our statistical power because we deemed Type II errors (failing to detect actual differences in fire ant metrics) more serious than Type I errors.
Jerry Schleicher lives in Parkville, Missouri, and while he's never lived around fire ants, he's certainly experienced their wrath.
The numbers of fire ant mounds can reach frightening densities, at 470 mounds [ha.
The name, fire ant, has become one of those generic terms, referring to any number of small, aggressive ants whose painful bite seems out of proportion to its tiny body.
Fadamiro's research may result in a new way to control the fire ant population in the United States.
MESSAGE: Over 'n Out Fire Ant Killer gives consumers empowerment to deliver unbeatable (implied) control they can count on.