fingerstick specimen

capillary specimen

A small blood sample taken by lancing a fingertip and placing one end of a capillary tube at the edge of the blood drop. The blood migrates up the tube by capillary action.

Tests commonly performed using capillary blood:
• Point-of-care testing—e.g., blood glucose monitoring;
• Complete blood count (CBC), haemoglobin and haematocrit (H&H);
• Peripheral blood smear—manual slide for white blood cell (WBC) differential;
• Neonatal blood gases;
• Neonatal bilirubin;
• Neonatal screening (filter paper or blood spot testing);
• Electrolytes;
• Serum lead in children.

fingerstick specimen

Capillary specimen Lab medicine A blood sample obtained by piercing a finger using spring-loaded device with a chisel or with a blade type lancet; once punctured, the fingertip is squeezed so that blood drops can be collected into a capillary tube or onto a glass slide; FSs can be used for micromethods–eg, to measure cholesterol, glucose, and other analytes
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensitivity and specificity analyses of the SHC using fingerstick specimens at the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County's STD clinic were significantly lower than the >98% reported by the manufacturer of SHC in a 510(k) submission (3).
Fingerstick specimens are currently used for a wide range of tests for haematology, chemistry and serology.
(15) A recent evaluation of three rapid tests by the San Francisco Department of Public Health showed that the Abbott Determine Syphilis TP test (Abbott Laboratories, South Pasadena, CA) had the highest sensitivity, 88% (95% CI 0.81 to 0.96), using whole-blood venipuncture samples, with both 100% sensitivity and specificity on 99 whole-blood fingerstick specimens. The test typically takes 15 minutes to perform, does not require sophisticated laboratory equipment, and costs approximately $2 per test.