fingerspelling


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements, representing letters of the alphabet, to spell words.
See also: American Manual Alphabet

fin·ger·spell·ing

(fing'gĕr-spel'ing)
Method of communication using specific finger and hand movements.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Dynamic fingerspelling recognition using geometric and motion features", In: Procs.
For methods that use only camera images, it is also hard to compare recognition performance achieved from different datasets for testing in Thai fingerspelling. For the recognition rate, our average classification precision is around 78% for 21 hand postures classification.
For example, providing staff with information sessions on deafblindness or training on fingerspelling may help staff facilitate more effective communication with entrepreneurs who are deafblind.
Should the researcher wish to study numerals or fingerspelling as a research category, an identifying annotation can be prefixed to facilitate search operations, e.g.
She was interviewed by Ann Bancroft, fingerspelling to her.
She also uses Deafblind Manual - a for m of fingerspelling the alphabet on the hands.
"Tail in the treetop tail in the tiny toolshed tail in the turnips": The clues cleverly use language and an extra clue is added through the use of Fingerspelling in American Sign Language.
The metalinguistic of fingerspelling: An alternate way to increase reading vocabulary in congenitally deaf readers.
Epenthesis is also common in fingerspelling. Only a few finger-spelled forms have an underlying movement, in DGS "J", "CH", "Z", and double letters, such as "NN", or "TT".
Eventually the whole team learned to sign, with varying degrees of success--some of whom were deemed to be "all thumbs." Hall of Fame pitcher Joe McGinnity was said to be careless with his fingerspelling. (19)
Fingerspelling formulae: A word is more or less the sum of its letters.
I even taught them fingerspelling, which they learned quickly, and the American Sign Language (ASL) equivalents of words that they were studying.